October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month 2018 banner

Week 04 – Help Safeguard the Nation’s Critical Infrastructure

Welcome to the fourth and final week of National Cyber Security Awareness Month. This week we focus on additional steps people can take to protect themselves in our digitally connected world. Not only do these steps help to protect you, your home and your workplace, they also help to protect the nation’s critical infrastructure.

Helpful Best Practices:

  • #LockDownURlogin – user names and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, bank and social media. Improve account security by enabling strong authentication tools such as biometrics (fingerprints or facial recognition) or unique one-time codes
  • Keep a Clean Machine – having the latest security software, web browser and operating system is the best defense against viruses, malware and other online threats
  • Safer for me, more secure for all – what you do online affects everyone. Good online habits help the global digital community
  • When in Doubt, Throw it Out – links in emails, posts and ads are often how criminals try to steal info. Always independently verify unexpected requests and communications

 

You can further help protect yourself and the nation’s critical infrastructure by:

  • Reading an OUCH! newsletter that reinforces vulnerabilities with Smart Home Devices and describes what you can do to secure them from today’s cyber threats
  • Reading an OUCH! newsletter that emphasizes the use of passphrases instead of password to secure your access

Welcome to the third week of National Cyber Security Awareness Month. This week we will focus on how to secure yourself at work. You may not realize it, but you are a target at work, regardless of what you do. You are an extension of our cybersecurity team, as effective cybersecurity requires everyone’s participation.

Helpful Best Practices:

  • Be able to detect cybersecurity incidents – recognizing an incident quickly can help minimize the impact
  • Be aware of non-public information in your custody – educate staff about their role in protecting data and encourage them to ask for help if they don’t know how to do so
  • Whatever your role at work, you’re the first and last line of defense in keeping our organization safe online – brush up on your cybersecurity awareness and stay vigilant to threats all year round
  • Protect yourself with alerts, tips and resources from @DHSgov @USCERT_gov

You can help secure your workplace by:

  • Reading an OUCH! newsletter that reinforces the basics of what social engineering attacks are and how to spot them
  • Reading an OUCH! newsletter that emphasizes how CIO Fraud continues to grow and advance, targeting organizations around the world.

Reviewing a poster that helps you understand the value you have to cyber-attackers and the different tactics they use to target you

Welcome to the second week of National Cyber Security Awareness Month. This week we are focused on how to get started in the exciting field of cyber security.

Cybersecurity is an exciting field and growing field with many diverse skills and experiences needed. A June Indeed.com blog post reports “…261% increase in job postings for data protection officers on Indeed since May 2017” and the US Department of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook projects a 28% growth in Information Security Analyst jobs through 2026.

A successful career in cyber security isn’t just about technical skills. There are actually a growing number of opportunities for people with strong soft skills as well.

Helpful Best Practices:

  • Make a difference! Teach about careers in cybersecurity by volunteering at school, boys & girls clubs and community centers
  • Veterans, the Internet needs you! – there are millions of rewarding jobs in cybersecurity. Consider a career in protecting the Internet.
  • Professors and Counselors, do your students know about the millions of opportunities in cybersecurity? Consider hosting a cyber pro or a hands-on workshop at your school to stoke inspiration!
  • As a parent, learn about the “educational steps” to a career in cybersecurity and about community organizations that host cyber camps to educate kids about Internet safety and security.

Getting started in cyber security is easier than you may think and here are some ways to get more information:

  • Follow CUNY’s major role in the newly announced Cyber NYC
  • CyberAces website that provides access to free online cybersecurity courses and career information
  • Cybersecurity Academies website that provides scholarship-based immersion academies that are free for participants
  • Cyber Start Go website that introduces students to the world of cybersecurity and describes various career opportunities in the field
  • Speak with your academic advisor and college career center staff member to learn more about educational and career opportunities

Welcome to the first week of National Cyber Security Awareness Month. This week we are focusing on basic cybersecurity essentials that you can use to protect your home and those you live with against cyber threats. Making your home environment secure also helps secure your work environment, particularly when working remotely or sharing information via cloud storage, synchronization and collaboration services.

Helpful Best Practices:

  • Keep a Clean Machine – having the latest security software, web browser and operating system is the best defense against viruses, malware and other online threats
    • Our cell phone and tablet need to be kept up to date with the latest security software, browsers and operating system, just like your PC or laptop at home
    • Smart appliances and connected devices – such as thermostats, toys and home assistants – should be kept up to date with the latest security software. If not, you’re at greater risk of hackers accessing your network and information
  • LockDownURlogin – user names and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, bank and social media. Improve account security by enabling strong authentication tools such as biometrics or unique one-time codes. CyberAware
  • User names and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, bank and social media. Improve account security by enabling strong authentication tools such as unique one-time codes.
  • Share with Care – think before posting about yourself and others online. Consider what a post reveals, who might see it and how it might affect you and others now and in the future
  • Old tweets, posts and photos may come back to haunt you. Think before you post and consider how it might be perceived now and in the future
  • Back it Up – protect your valuable work, music, photos and other digital information by making an electronic copy and storing it safely
  • Back up regularly! Having a recent copy of your files means you can retrieve them if you fall victim to ransomware
  • Personal Information is like money. Value it. Protect it. – information about you, such as your purchase history or location, has value – just like $$$. Be thoughtful about who gets that information and how it’s collected through devices, apps and websites
  • The connected devices and appliances in your home run on the data about YOU. Be mindful of how your info is being collected and stored
  • Secure Your WiFi Router – set a strong passphrase (at least 12 characters long) for your Wi-Fi network. Keep it positive and easy to remember like “Ilovecountrymusic!”
  • Change your Wi-Fi router’s default name and passphrase – set a strong passphrase (name your network in a way that doesn’t let people know it’s in your house

You can make your home environment more secure by:

  • Reading the OUCH! newsletter on creating a cyber secure home
  • Reviewing a security awareness poster on protecting your home
  • Watching a video (12 minutes) on keeping your children safe online
  • Sharing these materials with others, including your family, friends and neighbors

If you have any questions about any of this information, please contact your college’s Information Security Manager.

CUNY is once again participating in the National Cyber Security Awareness Month program run by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) to create awareness about cyber security. Each week in October, we will send you an email with information and tips from leading cybersecurity organizations on protecting you, your family and coworkers online. Our goal is to help you make the most of today’s technology…safely and securely.

Our weekly themes are as follows:

Week 1 – Make Your Home a Haven for Online Safety

Week 2 – Educating for a Rewarding Career in Cybersecurity

Week 3 – Your Part in Ensuring Online Safety at Work

Week 4 – Help Safeguard the Nation’s Critical Infrastructure

Remember that CUNY also provides an online security awareness course (please provide the registration information requested), that is catered to CUNY students, faculty and staff, and a growing security resources list on the CUNY Information Security pages. You may also want to subscribe to OUCH! – the world’s leading, free security awareness newsletter designed for technology users.

*National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) content is copyrighted and reproduced under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 3.0 or Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.