College Discipline

Andre AcimanAndre Aciman

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Comparative Literature
Email: aaciman@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8120

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André Aciman received his Ph. D. and A.M. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University and a B.A. in English and Comparative Literature from Lehman College. Before coming to The Graduate Center, he taught at Princeton University and Bard College. Although his specialty is in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English, French and Italian literature (he wrote his dissertation on Madame de LaFayette’s La Princesse de Clèves), he is especially interested in the theory of the psychological novel (roman d’analyse) across boundaries and eras.In addition to teaching the history of literary theory, he teaches the work of Marcel Proust and the literature of memory and exile. André Aciman is the Executive Officer of the Doctoral Program in Comparative Literature and the Director of The Writers’ Institute at the Graduate Center.He is also the author of the novel Call Me by Your Name, of the memoir Out of Egypt, and of False Papers: Essays on Exile and Memory. He has co-authored and edited The Proust Project and Letters of Transit. He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a fellowship from The New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, The Paris Review, as well as in several volumes of The Best American Essays.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Sos AgaianSos Agaian

College: College of Staten Island
Department: Computer Science
Email: sos.agaian@csi.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 982-2850

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Sos Agaian is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, CUNY. Prior to joining the City University of New York, Dr. Agaian was a Peter T. Flawn Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering with the University of Texas at San Antonio. He has been a visiting faculty at the Tufts University and the Leading Scientist at the AWARE, INC. (Bedford, MA).

His main research interests are in Computational Vision and Machine Learning, Big and Small Data Analytics, Multimodal Biometric and Digital Forensics. He has special interest in the development of scientific systems and architectures applicable to the theory and practice of engineering and computer sciences (emphasizing the usage of complex digital data processing, information sciences and systems technologies to solve the engineering challenges currently facing the military, medical and industrial information processing centers).

He has authored over 600 peer-reviewed research papers, ten books, and nineteen edited proceedings. He is listed as a co-inventor on 44 patents/disclosures. Several of Agaian’s IPs are commercially licensed. Moreover, he played the key role in establishing two start-ups and two university centers: The Center for Simulation Visualization & Real Time Prediction (NSF), and The National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Research sponsored by the DHS. Furthermore, he has been an invited and keynote speaker at numerous international image related conferences, and along with his students, has won several paper awards from the IEEE. He has mentored 38 Ph.D. students, many of whom have gone on to gain employment at Apple, Boeing, Raytheon Cisco Systems, Freescale, Dell, Motorola, Intel, Cirrus Logic, General Dynamics, Southwest Research Institute, Mediatek, MIT, Lincoln Lab, Johns Hopkins, Tufts University, Macau, China, India, Armenia, UTSA, and the Tampere Institute of Technology. Fifteen of Agaian’s protégés have received notable IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) and SPIE (International Society for Optics and Photonics) awards, including several best paper awards.

Dr. Agaian was elected SPIE Fellow in 2005 for his distinguished and valuable contribution to the field of optical engineering; AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) Fellow in 2010 for distinguished contributions to advances in the theory of intelligent imaging systems and applied science, including fundamental methodology, service to the profession, and engineering education; IS&T (Imaging Sciences & Technology) Fellow in 2013 for his outstanding contributions to the fields of multimedia-imaging and security systems, including embedded data decryption processes and data hiding methods for mobile communications, and; IEEE Fellow in 2017 “for his contributions to biologically-inspired visual data processing systems.” He also serves as a foreign member of the Armenian National Academy. He received the Distinguished Research Award at the University of Texas at San Antonio, which is its highest research award. He is a member Eta Kappa Nu, and received The Most Influential Member-Award of the School of Engineering, nominated by Tufts University students. Furthermore, he is the recipient of MAEStro Educator of the Year Award, sponsored by the Society of Mexican American Engineers. As well, he is a recipient of the Innovator of the Year Award (UTSA 2014), of the Tech Flash Titans-Top Researcher-Award (San Antonio Business Journal, 2014), and the Entrepreneurship Award (UTSA- 2013 and 2016).

Dr. Agaian received his M.S. degree (summa cum laude) in Mathematics and Mechanics from Yerevan State University, Armenia; his Ph.D. in Mathematics and Physics from the Steklov Institute of Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS); and his Doctor of Engineering Sciences degree from the Institute of Control Systems, RAS.

Current Scholarly Interests:

Computational Vision and Machine Learning, Data Analytics, Multimodal Biometric and Digital Forensics, Information Processing and Fusion, 3D Imaging Visible and Thermal Sensors, Multimedia Security, Needs-Driven Medical and Biomedical Technology.

College of Staten Island Computer Science

Richard AlbaRichard Alba

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Sociology
Email: ralba@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8773

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The seeds of Richard Alba’s interest in ethnicity were sown during his childhood in the Bronx of the 1940s and 1950s and nurtured intellectually at Columbia University, where he received his undergraduate and graduate education, completing his Ph.D. in 1974. He was Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, SUNY, until September 2008; he now holds that title at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.His teaching and research focus mainly on race/ethnicity and international migration, in the U.S. and in Europe, where he has done research in France and in Germany, with the support of Fulbright grants and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the German Marshall Fund and Russell Sage Foundation. His books include Ethnic Identity: The Transformation of White America (1990); Italian Americans: Into the Twilight of Ethnicity (1985); and, most recently, Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration (2003), co-written with Victor Nee. The last book won the 2004 Thomas & Znaniecki Book Award of the American Sociological Association and the 2005 Mirra Komarovsky Award of the Eastern Sociological Society. It was also the 2003 Honorable mention of the Association of American Publishers for the Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Award in Sociology & Anthropology.

He has been elected Vice President of the American Sociological Association and President of the Eastern Sociological Society.

CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Meena AlexanderMeena Alexander

College: Hunter College
Department: English
Email: malexander@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-5200

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Meena Alexander was born in Allahabad, India. She is considered one of the foremost poets of her generation. She has a B.A. Honors in French and English from Khartoum University and a Ph.D. from Nottingham University. Her works have been widely anthologized and translated. They include Illiterate Heart, (winner of the PEN Open Book Award), Quickly Changing River, and the forthcoming Birthplace with Buried Stones. She has edited Indian Love Poems and published a critically acclaimed memoir Fault Lines (picked as one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of the year).

Her poems have been set to music, including “Impossible Grace,” which was the lyric base of the First Al Quds Music Award and “Acqua Alta, ” which was set to music by the Swedish composer Jan Sandstrom for the Serikon Music Group’s climate change project.Her writings on trauma, migration and memory, including The Shock of Arrival and Poetics of Dislocation are important for the evolving understanding of postcolonialiality.She is a recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award in Literature from the South Asian Literary Association and has received awards from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Arts Council of England and the American Council of Learned Societies. She has served as an Elector, American Poets Corner, Cathedral of St. John the Divine. She is Distinguished Professor of English at the Graduate Center and Hunter College, City University of New York.

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Hunter College Arts & Humanities

Robert AlfanoRobert Alfano

College: The City College of New York
Department: Physics
Email: ralfano@sci.ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-5531

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Robert Alfano is a Distinguished Professor of Science and Engineering at the City College of CUNY, where he has been a faculty member in the Department of Physics since 1972. Prior to joining the City College, Dr. Alfano was a Research Physicist at GTE Research Laboratories, 1964-1972. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from New York University in 1972, and his Bachelor’s and Master’s in Physics from Fairleigh Dickinson University in 1963 and 1964, respectively. He is a Fellow of American Physical Society, Optical Society of America, and IEEE. He is director of CCNY’s Institute of Ultrafast Spectroscopy and Lasers.Robert Alfano has been involved in developing ultrafast laser spectroscopic techniques and applications of these techniques to study ultrafast dynamical processes in physical, chemical, and biological systems. His research encompasses the study and development of supercontinuum, tunable solid-state lasers, nonlinear optical processes, application of optical spectroscopic techniques for medical diagnosis (optical biopsy), study of photon migration in turbid media, and development of optical imaging techniques for biomedical imaging (optical mammography). He has published more than 700 papers and holds 102 patents. He has mentored 50 Ph.D. students.

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The City College of New York Natural Sciences

Eric AltermanEric Alterman

College: Brooklyn College
Department: English
Email: Whatliberalmedia@aol.com

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Eric Alterman is a Distinguished Professor of English at Brooklyn College, City University of New York, and Professor of Journalism at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.He is also “The Liberal Media” columnist for The Nation, a senior fellow and “Altercation” weblogger for MediaMatters for America, (formerly at MSNBC.com) in Washington, DC, a senor fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington, DC, where he writes and edits the “Think Again” column, a senior fellow (since 1985) at the World Policy Institute at The New School in New York, and a history consultant to HBO Films.Alterman is the author of six books, including the national bestsellers, What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News (2003, 2004), and The Book on Bush: How George W. (Mis)leads America (with Mark Green, 2004). The others include: When Presidents Lie: A History of Official Deception and its Consequences, (2004, 2005). His Sound & Fury: The Making of the Punditocracy (1992, 2000), won the 1992 George Orwell Award and his It Ain’t No Sin to be Glad You’re Alive: The Promise of Bruce Springsteen (1999, 2001), won the 1999 Stephen Crane Literary Award, and Who Speaks for America? Why Democracy Matters in Foreign Policy, (1998).

Termed “the most honest and incisive media critic writing today” in the National Catholic Reporter, and author of “the smartest and funniest political journal out there,” in The San Francisco Chronicle, Alterman is frequent lecturer and contributor to virtually every significant national publication in the US and many in Europe. In recent years, he has also been a columnist for: Worth,Rolling Stone, Mother Jones, and The Sunday Express (London). A former Adjunct Professor of Journalism at NYU and Columbia, Alterman received his B.A. in History and Government from Cornell, his M.A. in International Relations from Yale, and his Ph.D. in US History from Stanford. He lives with his family inManhattan where he is completing his seventh book, Why We’re Liberals: A Political Handbook to Post-Bush America, to be published by Viking in March 2008.

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Brooklyn College Arts & Humanities

Arthur ApterArthur Apter

College: Baruch College
Department: Mathematics
Email: awapter@alum.mit.edu
Office Phone: (646) 312-4123

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Professor Arthur W. Apter was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, where he attended New York City public schools. After graduation in 1971 from Sheepshead Bay High School, he attended MIT, where he earned his B.S in Mathematics in 1975 and his Ph.D. in Mathematics in 1978.After spending one additional postdoctoral year at MIT, he spent two years in the Mathematics Department of the University of Miami and five years in the Mathematics Department of Rutgers University – Newark Campus.He has been affiliated with the Mathematics Department of Baruch College since 1986, and was appointed to the Doctoral Faculty in Mathematics of the CUNY Graduate Center in 2006. He was the doctoral advisor of Shoshana Friedman (Ph.D. CUNY 2009) and doctoral co-advisor of Grigor Sargsyan (Ph.D. UC Berkeley 2009), whom he mentored as an undergraduate in the CUNY Baccalaureate Program. He has also supervised two additional students in advanced reading courses in mathematics as undergraduates, Lilit Martirosyan and Chase Skipper.

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Baruch College Natural Sciences

Stanley AronowitzStanley Aronowitz

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Sociology and Urban Education
Email: saronowitz@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-2001

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Stanley Aronowitz has taught at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York since 1983, where he is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology. He received his B.A. at the New School in 1968 and his Ph.D from the Union Graduate School in 1975.He studies labor, social movements, science and technology, education, social theory and cultural studies and is director of the Center for the Study of Culture, Technology and Work at the Graduate Center. He is author or editor of twenty three books including: Just Around Corner The Paradox of the Jobless Recovery (2005); How Class Works (2003); The Last Good Job in America (2001); The Knowledge Factory (2000); The Jobless Future: Sci-tech and the Dogma of Work (1994, with William DiFazio); and False Promises: The Shaping of American Working Class Consciousness (1973,1992).

He is founding editor of the journal Social Text and is currently a member of its advisory board, and he sits on the editorial boards of Cultural Critique and Ethnography. He has published more than two hundred articles and reviews in publications such as Harvard Educational Review, Social Policy, The Nation, and The American Journal of Sociology. Prior to coming to the Graduate School he taught at the University of California-Irvine and Staten Island Community College. He has been visiting professor or scholar at University of Wisconsin, Madison, the University of Paris, Lund University and Columbia University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Sergei ArtemovSergei Artemov

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Computer Science, Mathematics, and Philosophy
Email: sartemov@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8661

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Sergei N. Artemov is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He came to CUNY with years of experience acquired in leading research centers around the world, including Cornell University, Stanford University, Moscow State University, and the Russian Academy of Sciences, as well as in France, Switzerland, Italy, and the Netherlands. He is the founder and head of the Research Laboratory for Logic and Computation at the CUNY Graduate Center and is also a founder of Logical Problems in Computer Science, a research laboratory at Moscow State University, of which he was Director for 10 years. His activities at the CUNY Graduate Center include heading a research seminar on Computational Logic, the CUNY Computer Science Colloquium, and the New York Logic Colloquium.Professor Artemov received his B.A. (cum laude) and Ph.D. from Moscow State University. His professional interests are logic in computer science, mathematical logic and proof theory, modal and epistemic logics, knowledge representation and artificial intelligence, automated deduction and verification, and optimal control and hybrid systems.Professor Artemov has pioneered studies of the Logic of Proofs. His major accomplishments in this area include solutions of two problems that had been open since the 1930’s: Gödel’s problem on provability interpretation for modal logic, and formalization of the Brouwer-Heyting-Kolmogorov provability semantics. He has developed a Justification Logic that renders a new, evidence-based foundation for epistemic logic that captures Plato’s view of knowledge as justified true belief. He, along with other researchers from Stanford and Cornell, initiated studies of Dynamic Topological Logic, which has become an active research area with applications.

Professor Artemov has authored more than 164 research papers and supervised 20 successful Ph.D. dissertations and post-doctoral fellows. He is an editor of Annals of Pure and Applied Logic; Moscow Mathematical Journal; the monograph series Studies in Logic, Mathematical Logic and Foundations, and has been the principal organizer of a number of international conferences, including the symposium series Logical Foundations of Computer Science. He has delivered a Distinguished Lecture for the New York Academy of Sciences, Clifford Lectures, the Spinoza Lecture for the European Association for Computer Science Logic, the keynote lecture for the Kurt Goedel Society in Vienna, and a score of plenary and colloquium addresses at leading conferences and research centers worldwide. His paper “Operational Modal Logic” was commended for its excellence by the IGPL/FoLLI Prize Committee for Best Idea of the Year, 1996.

Professor Artemov has been a recipient of numerous research grants in Russia, Europe and the United States. He was awarded a fellowship from the President of Russia “To an Outstanding Scientist,” as well as a number of awards from the Russian Academy of Sciences.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Paul AttewellPaul Attewell

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Sociology
Email: pattewell@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8778

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Professor Attewell was born in London, and completed his undergraduate education in England before moving to the United States to pursue a doctorate in sociology at the University of California at San Diego. He then taught for several years at the University of California at Santa Cruz and at Stony Brook University in New York before joining the faculty at the CUNY Graduate Center in 1990, where he works in two doctoral programs: sociology and urban education. Professor Attewell’s recent research has been in the sociology of education with a focus on the relationship between educational institutions and social inequality. He has studied middle and high schools and colleges. His co-authored book Passing the Torch: Does Higher Education Pay Off Across the Generations? won the American Education Research Association’s Outstanding Book Award, and also the Grawemeyer Award in Education. His current research focuses on the reasons for low degree completion rates in non-selective colleges, and includes randomized controlled field experiments in which lower income undergraduates are encouraged to increase their “academic momentum” in college, using monetary incentives.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Sanjoy BanerjeeSanjoy Banerjee

College: The City College of New York
Department: Chemical Engineering
Email: banerjee@che.ccny.cuny.edu

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Born in Calcutta, India, Professor Banerjee holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology and he earned his Ph.D. at the University of Waterloo in Canada. After working eight years with Atomic Energy of Canada, he was Westinghouse Professor in the Engineering and Physics Department at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., from 1976 to 1980, when he joined the faculty at The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB).At UCSB, he served as Vice Chair of the Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, 1981 — 1983, and Chair of Chemical Engineering, 1984 — 1989. He also was Mitsubishi Visiting Chair at University of Tokyo and Burgers Visiting Chair in Fluid Mechanics at University of Delft, the Netherlands, in 1996, Guest Professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, 1989 — 1990, and a Visiting Professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at The University of California, Berkeley, 1979 — 1981.He currently serves as a member of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). This Congressionally mandated body maintains oversight on U.S. reactor regulation and regulatory research. In addition, he is a member of the USNRC Advanced Thermal Reactors Review Group and the NASA Fluid Physics Review Group.

In 2006, Professor Banerjee received the Donald Q. Kern Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for his seminal work on transport phenomena in multiphase systems. This research has had major impact on the analyses of plant safety and environmental processes.

Other awards include the Danckwerts Memorial Lecture to the Chemical Engineering Science/Institution of Chemical Engineers in London in 1991 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Melville Medal in 1983. He is listed as author on more than 190 articles, book chapters and refereed conference proceedings and holds four patents.

The City College of New York Natural Sciences

Beth BaronBeth Baron

College: The City College of New York
Department: History
Email: bbaron@gc.cuny.edu
Phone: (212) 817-7574
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Beth Baron, Distinguished Professor of History at City College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, specializes in modern Middle Eastern history. At CUNY, she has spearheaded the growth of Middle Eastern Studies. She co-founded and now directs the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center at the CUNY Graduate Center and with colleagues developed its MA program in Middle Eastern Studies in addition to launching a track to train PhD students in Middle Eastern history.

From 2009 to 2014, she edited the International Journal of Middle East Studies, the leading journal in the field, and serves as president of the Middle East Studies Association of North America (MESA) through November 2017. In her capacity as president, Baron has championed academic freedom in the Middle East and North America and led the association’s fight against the Muslim ban. MESA, through the representation of the ACLU became a plaintiff in the case International Refugee Assistance Project, et al. v. Donald Trump, et al., which has made its way to the United States Supreme Court. Among the honors she has received, Baron was named a Carnegie Scholar in 2007-2008.

Baron’s research focuses on the social history of modern Egypt. Her recent book, The Orphan Scandal: Christian Missionaries and the Rise of the Muslim Brotherhood, examines the relationship between Protestant evangelicals and Islamists, arguing that groups such as the Muslim Brotherhood arose in part in reaction to, and in the image of, American and European missionary associations. Earlier books, Egypt as a Woman: Nationalism, Gender, and Politics and The Women’s Awakening in Egypt: Culture, Society, and the Press, pioneer gender and women’s history.

Baron’s latest project is a book on the history of disease, medicine, and reproductive health in colonial Egypt, which follows a pair of articles she authored on slavery in Ottoman Egypt.

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The City College of New York History

Laird BergadLaird Bergad

College: Lehman College – CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Latin American and Puerto Rican Studies; History
Email: lbergad@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: 212-817-8465/8438

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Laird W. Bergad has been on the faculty of Lehman College’s Department of Latin American and Puerto Rican Studies since 1980 and the Ph.D. Program in History at the Graduate Center from 1985. He is an internationally-respected authority on the social, economic and demographic history of slave-based plantation societies in Latin America and the Caribbean during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He has published a series of innovative and landmark studies based on archival research that have broadened the historical understanding of Puerto Rico, Cuba, Brazil, and slavery in the Americas.Professor Bergad is the founder and director of the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. He is the author of six books and numerous scholarly articles. His first book Coffee and the Growth of Agrarian Capitalism in Nineteenth-Century Puerto Rico (Princeton University Press 1983) revised the analytical framework for understanding Puerto Rican history prior to the United States occupation and annexation of 1898. He was one of the first foreign scholars to be granted unrestricted access to Cuban historical archives in the 1980s. His research there resulted in two books: Cuban Rural Society in the Nineteenth Century: The Social and Economic History of Monoculture in Matanzas (Princeton University Press 1990), which examines the evolution of the sugar plantation economy in nineteenth-century Cuba, and (co-authored) The Cuban Slave Market, 1790-1880 (Cambridge University Press 1995), the first empirical examination of the structure of Cuban slave society during the island’s reign as the Caribbean’s leading sugar-producing and slave-importing nation. For this latter book he took thirteen Lehman College students to Cuba in 1988 as a research team which worked in the Cuban National Archives along with twelve students from the University of Havana.

In the 1990s, he turned his attention toward Brazil and began research in the historical archives of Minas Gerais, Brazil’s largest slave-holding province during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. His resulting work was The Demographic and Economic History of Slavery in Minas Gerais, Brazil, 1720-1888 (Cambridge University Press 1999) is a detailed study of slavery in Brazil. He then wrote a synthetic work on the largest slave societies in the Americas, The Comparative Histories of Slavery in Brazil, Cuba, and the United States (Cambridge University Press 2007). Finally, his Hispanics in the United States: A Demographic, Social, and Economic History (co-authored) (forthcoming Cambridge University Press 2010) is the first full-length quantitative study of the U.S. Latino population in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

The recipient of several internationally recognized awards, including Guggenheim, Fulbright and National Endowment for the Humanity fellowships, he was the founding director of Lehman’s interdisciplinary program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, chaired the College’s Department of Latin American and Puerto Rican Studies, and was a member of the Executive Committee of the CUNY/Cuba (and later Caribbean) Scholarly Exchange Program, as well as the CUNY-University of Puerto Rico Exchange.

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Lehman College – CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Emily BraunEmily Braun

College: Hunter College
Department: Art
Email: ebraun@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-3756

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In addition to her work on modern Italian art and fascist culture, Professor Emily Braun has published on renaissance architecture, late nineteenth-century European painting, twentieth-century American art, women’s studies, Jewish history, and contemporary painting and sculpture. She was awarded a Senior Research Grant from the Getty Foundation (1993), the Hunter College Presidential Award for Excellence in Scholarship (2001), and a Fellowship from the New York Public Library Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers (2002). As a contributing author, she has twice received the annual Henry Allen Moe Prize for Catalogues of Distinction in the Arts (Northern Light: Realism and Symbolism in Scandinavian Painting (1982) and Gardens and Ghettos. (1990)

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Hunter College Arts & Humanities

John BrenkmanJohn Brenkman

College: Baruch College
Department: English
Email: john.brenkman@baruch.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 312-3921

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John Brenkman, Distinguished Professor, teaches American literature, the novel, and various special topics in modern literature at Baruch College. He also teaches in the PhD Programs in English and Comparative Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center and directs the U.S.-Europe Seminar at Baruch College. A literary critic and political theorist, Professor Brenkman’s latest book is The Cultural Contradictions of Democracy: Political Thought since September 11 (Princeton University Press, 2007).Previous publications include Culture and Domination (Cornell) and Straight Male Modern: A Cultural Critique of Psychoanalysis (Routledge) and more than fifty essays and articles. Recent work on novel theory includes “Innovation: Notes on Nihilism and the Aesthetics of the Novel” (The Novel, Volume 2: Themes and Forms, ed. Franco Moretti [Princeton]), “On Voice” (Essentials of the Theory of Fiction, ed. Hoffman and Murphy [Duke]), and several essays for the journal L’Atelier du roman. Other recent essays include “Freud the Modernist” (The Mind of Modernism, ed. Mark S. Micale [Stanford]), “Queer Post-Politics” (Narrative), and “Extreme Criticism” (Critical Inquiry). He has lectured most recently at Columbia, Northwestern, Dartmouth, Stanford, Minnesota, University of Paris, and University of Turin.

Educated at the University of Iowa, Professor Brenkman taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University before coming to CUNY. He has been a fellow at the Oregon State University Humanities Center and a Visiting Professor at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and the Institut du Monde Anglophone at the University of Paris III, and he directed an NEH Summer Seminar for College Teachers in 1995 on “Culture and Democracy: Emergent American Literatures.” He is a past president of the English Institute at Harvard University.

Professor Brenkman was a founding editor of the journal Social Text. He also edited the literary magazine Venue. He contributes regularly to the French political quarterly Le Meilleur des mondes. During 2008-2009 he was a participant in the seminar of the Great Issues Forum at the Graduate Center on the topic “Power in the Contemporary World.”

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Baruch College Arts & Humanities

Susan Buck-MorssSusan Buck-Morss

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Political Science
Email: sbuck-morss@gc.cuny.edu

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Susan Buck-Morss is an interdisciplinary thinker and a prolific writer of international reputation. Her most recent book, Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2009), offers a fundamental reinterpretation of Hegel’s master-slave dialectic by linking it to the influence of the Haitian Revolution. Her books The Origin of Negative Dialectics: Theodor W. Adorno, WalterBenjamin, and the Frankfurt Institute (Macmillan Free Press, 1977) and The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project (MIT Press, 1989) have been translated into several languages and have been called “modern classics in the field.” Other publications include Thinking Past Terror: Islamism and Critical Theory on the Left (Verso, 2003), Dreamworld and Catastrophe: The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West (MIT Press, 2000), and numerous articles.

A longtime professor at Cornell University’s Department of Government, Buck-Morss was also a member of Cornell’s graduate fields in Comparative Literature; History of Art; German Studies; and the School of Architecture, Art, and City and Regional Planning. She is on the editorial boards of several journals and has been an invited lecturer at dozens of universities worldwide. Her numerous international awards and fellowships include a Getty Scholar grant, a Fulbright Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She holds a Ph.D. in European intellectual history from Georgetown University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Scott BurnhamScott Burnham

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Music
Email: sburnham@gc.cuny.edu

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Scott Burnham holds a B.M. from Baldwin-Wallace College, a M.M. in Music Composition from the Yale University School of Music, and a Ph.D. in Music Theory and Analysis from Brandeis University.

His research interests include the history of tonal theory, problems of analysis and criticism, and 18-and 19th-century music and culture. He also enjoys giving pre-concert lectures and other public talks in the greater New York region.

Beethoven Hero, Burnham’s study of the values and reception of Beethoven’s heroic-style music, received the 1996 Wallace Berry Award from the Society of Music Theory. His more recent book, Mozart’s Grace, an exploration of beauty in Mozart’s music, received the 2014 Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society. Burnham has also been the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Humanities Center. Before joining the faculty at the Graduate Center, Burnham was Scheide Professor of Music History at Princeton University, where he taught from 1989 to 2016.

Current Scholarly Interests:

History of tonal theory, problems of analysis and criticism, and 18-and 19th-century music and culture.

CUNY Graduate Center Music

Peter CareyPeter Carey

College: Hunter College
Department: English
Email: pcarey@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-5074

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One of the most original, talented and prolific writers in the English language today, Peter Carey has won the Booker Prize twice, the Commonwealth Prize twice and many other distinctions. He has been named a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has been awarded three honorary doctorates. His work has been translated into at least 30 languages. Three of his novels are considered masterpieces—The True History of the Kelly Gang, Oscar and Lucinda, and Jack Maggs, and two have been made into films —Oscar and Lucinda and Bliss. He joined the Hunter College faculty in 2003, having been a Visiting Professor the previous Fall. As Director of Hunter’s MFA program in Creative Writing, which the Village Voice in October called “the Best MFA in New York City,” Professor Carey has attracted leading writers to participate in the Distinguished Writers Series including Toni Morrison, Eavan Boland, Annie Proulx and Ian McEwan. He has helped develop the unique Hertog Fellows Program in which MFA students win fellowships as research assistants for major writers such as Salman Rushdie and Toni Morrison. Among the many students whose talents he has nurtured is 2006 Booker Prize winner Kiran Desai.

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Hunter College Arts & Humanities

Marvin CarlsonMarvin Carlson

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Theatre and Comparative Literature
Email: mcarlson@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8877

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Marvin A. Carlson, Distinguished Professor (Graduate Center), has a Ph.D. in Drama and Theatre from Cornell University. The Sidney E. Cohn Distinguished Professor of Theatre and Comparative Literature, his research and teaching interests include dramatic theory and Western European theatre history and dramatic literature, especially of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. He has been awarded the ATHE Career Achievement Award, the George Jean Nathan Prize, the Bernard Hewitt prize, the George Freedley Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has been a Walker-Ames Professor at the University of Washington, a Fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies at Indiana University, a Visiting Professor at the Freie Universitat of Berlin, and a Fellow of the American Theatre. His best-known book, Theories of the Theatre (Cornell University Press, 1993), has been translated into seven languages. His 2001 book, The Haunted Stage won the Calloway Prize. His newest book, Performance: A Critical Introduction, appeared in a second, revised edition in 2002.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Noel CarrollNoel Carroll

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: knollcarroll@gmail.com

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Noël Carroll, distinguished professor of philosophy and one of the leading philosophers of art and aesthetics in the U.S., is internationally recognized for his groundbreaking work in the philosophy of film. He is the author of eleven monographs, including The Philosophy of Motion Pictures, Beyond Aesthetics, and The Philosophy of Horror; three edited collections; and over two hundred academic articles and reviews. His work also encompasses the philosophy of literature, the philosophy of visual arts, and social and cultural theory, and he has served as president of the American Society for Aesthetics. Carroll has been a regular contributor of journalistic reviews of dance, theater, and film in publications such as Artforum and the Village Voice. His new book, On Criticism, will be published in Fall 2008, and he is currently working on a book on the philosophy of humor. Carroll joins the Graduate Center from Temple University. He holds a Ph.D. in Cinema Studies from NYU, and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Mary CawsMary Caws

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Comparative Literature, English, and French
Email: macaws@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8371

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Mary Ann Caws was born and grew up in Wilmington, North Carolina. Her father was Harmon Chadbourn Rorison, of Scottish heritage (McDonald of the Isle of Skye), her mother, Margaret Devereux Lippitt, was the only daughter of the painter Margaret Walthour Lippitt. Professor Caws attended the National Cathedral School, and went on to get her B.A. (cum laude) at Bryn Mawr in 1954, her M.A. at Yale University (1956), her doctorate from the University of Kansas in 1962; she holds an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Union College (1983).From her marriage with Peter James Caws, (they married at Yale in 1956 and divorced in 1987), Professor Caws has two children, Hilary and Matthew. She is currently Distinguished Professor of English, French, and Comparative Literature at the Graduate School of the City University of New York, and on the faculty of the Women’s Studies and Film Certificate Programs. Professor Caws was co-Director of the Henri Peyre French Institute from 1980 to 2002. She is an Officer of the Palmes Académiques (awarded by the French Minister of Education) and a former Trustee of the French Institute of Washington.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Raquel Chang-RodriguezRaquel Chang-Rodriguez

College: The City College of New York
Department: Foreign Languages and Literature
Email: rchangrodriguez@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-7920

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Raquel Chang-Rodríguez (PhD, New York University) is Distinguished Professor of Hispanic literature and culture at the Graduate Center and the City College (CCNY) of the City University of New York (CUNY). She has held visiting posts at Colgate University as Colgate Professor of the Humanities and at Columbia University, and has participated in seminars and courses in Spain, Peru, and Germany.A specialist in Colonial Literary Studies with emphasis on the Andean area and Mexico, Chang-Rodríguez has authored, edited and co-edited books treating the chronicles of the early contact period and native historians, as well as colonial drama and poetry. Among her books are: La apropiación del signo: tres cronistas indígenas del Perú (Arizona State University, 1988), El discurso disidente: ensayos de literatura colonial peruana (Catholic University of Peru, 1991), Hidden Messages: Representation and Resistance in Andean Colonial Drama (1999, Bucknell UP), and La palabra y la pluma en Primer nueva corónica y buen gobierno(Catholic University of Peru, 2005). She has published articles and book chapters in journals and collections from Europe and the Americas, and has contributed to major national and international projects such as Latin American Writers (Scribner’s, 1989), History of Literature in the Caribbean (John Benjamins, 1994), Diccionario Enciclopédico de las Letras de América Latina (Biblioteca Ayacucho, 1995), the
Encyclopedia of Latin American History (Scribner’s, 1996), Storia della civiltá letteraria ispanoamericana (Torino, UTET, 2000. She edited La cultura letrada en la Nueva España del siglo XVII,the second volume of an
ambitious new history of Mexican literature publishedin 2002 by SigloXXI/ Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). In 2006 Chang-Rodríguez coordinated the simultaneous publication in English and Spanish of : Beyond Books and Borders: Garcilaso de la Vega and La Florida del Inca(Bucknell UP)/Franqueando fronteras: Garcilaso de la Vega y La Florida del Inca (Catholic University of Peru).

Raquel Chang-Rodríguez was the recipient of a semester fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Her research projects have been supported by the Reed Foundation, the Inter-Americas Society of Arts and Letters, the Mex-Am Cultural Foundation, The Program for Cultural Cooperation between Spain’s Ministry of Culture and US Universities, the New York Council for the Humanities, the Organization for American States (OAS).

Professor Chang-Rodríguez is the founding editor of Colonial Latin American Review, the prize winning journal devoted to studying the colonial period from an interdisciplinary perspective, and served as its General Editor from 1992 to 2003. She has served twice (1985-87; 1997-2000), as President of the International Institute of Iberoamerican Literature [Instituto Internacional de Literatura Iberoamericana (IILI)].

Chang-Rodríguez is H onorary Associate of the Hispanic Society of America and was incorporated with the title of Profesora Honoraria to the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru. Currents projects research colonial poetry and women writers.

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The City College of New York Arts & Humanities

Eugene ChudnovskyEugene Chudnovsky

College: Lehman College
Department: Physics and Astronomy
Email: chudnov@lehman.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 960-8770

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Distinguished Professor Eugene M. Chudnovsky, who has been a member of the Lehman Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty since 1988, is an internationally prominent theoretical physicist. He is known for his
theoretical predictions of the phenomenon of magnetic poles “tunneling.” His experimental research also helped lead to the discovery of “quantum magnetic hysteresis,” a novel physics effect reported by major science journals, including Science, Nature and Physics Today. In 1993, he was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society for his “seminal contributions to random ferromagnetism, macrosopic quantum tunneling, and hexatic order in high-temperature superconductors.”Professor Chudnovsky has published more than 120 research articles in physics journals. He is frequently invited to give plenary and review talks on his research at major scientific meetings.

The U.S. Department of Energy has supported Professor Chudnovsky’s research since 1993. This research has resulted in the discovery of the possibility of a new state of matter—“quantum fluid of vortices”—and the prediction of dynamic interaction of vortices with oxygen atoms in high-temperature superconductors. Since 1990, he has been working on projects for the U.S. Air Force, the National Science Foundation and U.S. industries.

Born in Leningrad, Professor Chudnovsky was educated at Kharkov University in the Ukraine, where he received his Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1973.

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Lehman College Natural Sciences

Blanche CookBlanche Cook

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: History
Email: bcook@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 237-8813

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Blanche Wiesen Cook is Distinguished Professor of History and Women’s Studies at John Jay College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her biography, Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume I (Viking Penguin 1992), and Volume II (Viking Penguin 1999) received numerous awards and were on The New York Times best seller list. Volume I won The Los Angeles Times’ 1992 Biography Prize, and the Lambda Literary Award.She is currently working on the third and final volume of Eleanor Roosevelt. The New York State Council on the Humanities honored her as Scholar of the Year in 1996. A frequent contributor of reviews and columns in many newspapers and periodicals, her book The Declassified Eisenhower was listed by The New York Times Book Review as one of the notable books of 1981. She is also the author of Crystal Eastman on Women and Revolution (Oxford University Press).

For more than twenty years Professor Cook produced and hosted her own program for Radio Pacifica, originally called “Activists and Agitators,” subsequently “Women and the World in the 1980s.” She has appeared on such television programs as “The Today Show,” “Good Morning America,” C-Span’s “Booknotes,” and “MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour,” where she participated in the joint PBS-NBC coverage of the 1992 Democratic National Convention. More recently she has hosted various programs for CUNY-TV and in 2010 received the Publishing Triangle’s Bill Whitehead Lifetime Achievement Award.

Professor Cook is deeply committed to the principle of greater dignity, security and human rights for all people worldwide. She is former Vice-President for Research of the American Historical Association, was Vice-President and Chair of the Fund for Open Information and Accountability (FOIA, Inc.), and Co-Founder and Co-Chair of the Freedom of Information and Access Committee of the Organization of American Historians. Actively committed to maintaining the integrity of the Freedom of Information, she also served on the US State Department’s Historical Advisory Committee.

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John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

John CoriglianoJohn Corigliano

College: Lehman College
Department: Music
Email: John.Corigliano@lehman.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 960-8250

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John Corigliano is among the most honored composers in the United States. He was awarded the 2001 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his Symphony No. 2, introduced in November 2000 by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and subsequently heard in New York, Helsinki, Berlin, and Moscow. In March 2000, Corigliano’s third film score, for “The Red Violin,” was awarded the Academy Award (“Oscar.”)Corigliano’s Symphony No. 1, an impassioned response to the AIDS crisis, captured the 1991 Grawemeyer Award for Best New Orchestral Composition; The Chicago Symphony’s recording of the piece won the Grammy awards for both Best New Composition and Best Orchestral Performance, and it has has been played by more than 150 different orchestras worldwide. A Distinguished Professor of Music at the City University of New York, Corigliano was named in 1991 both to the faculty of the Juilliard School and to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, an organization of American’s most prominent artists, sculptors, architects, writers, and composers.

Commissioned by The Metropolitan Opera, where it premiered in December 1991, Corigliano’s “grand opera buffa” The Ghosts of Versailles sold out two engagements at the Metropolitan (1991 and 1994) as well as its 1995 production at the Chicago Lyric Opera. The nationwide telecast of the Metropolitan’s premiere production was released on videocassette and laser-disk by Deutsche Grammophon. Following its premiere, The Ghosts of Versailles collected the Composition of the Year award from the first International Classic Music Awards. In April 1999, The Ghosts of Versailles received its European premiere, in a new production directed and designed for the opening of the new opera house in Hannover, Germany.

Recent works include 2004’s Circus Maximus: Symphony No. 3, for multiple wind ensembles: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (“The Red Violin”) released on compact disk by Sony in September 2007 with Marin Alsop leading soloist Joshua Bell and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra; the orchestral song cycle Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Poems of Bob Dylan, recorded for Naxos in February 2007, with JoAnn Falletta leading soprano soloist Hila Plitmann and the Buffalo Philharmonic; and A Dylan Thomas Trilogy (1999), a memory play/oratorio for boy soprano, tenor, baritone, chorus and orchestra, which will be recorded November 2007 by Leonard Slatkin and the Nashville Symphony Orchestra.

Corigliano’s catalogue includes five concerti, for flute, clarinet, oboe, guitar, and piano; numerous shorter works for large orchestra; and an extensive catalogue of chamber works, which have been recorded on numerous major labels. His music is published exclusively by G. Schirmer, Inc.

Lehman College Arts & Humanities

Vincent CrapanzanoVincent Crapanzano

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Anthropology and Comparative Literature
Email: vcrapanzano@earthlink.net
Office Phone: (212) 817-8169

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Vincent Crapanzano graduated from the Ecole Internationale in Geneva, received his B.A. in philosophy from Harvard, and his PhD in anthropology from Columbia University. He has taught at Princeton, Harvard, the University of Chicago, the University of Paris, the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, the University of Brasilia, and the University of Cape Town. He has lectured in major universities in North and South America, Europe, Hong Kong, and South Africa.He has written on: the epistemology of interpretation, psychoanalysis, ethnopsychiatry and folk healing, spirit possession, theories of the self and other, domination, life histories and the articulation of experience, literalism, fieldwork and the writing of anthropology, imaginative horizons, memory, transgression and hope, referentiality and pragmatics, literary criticism and various literary works. These have appeared in various academic journals as well as such magazine and newspapers as The New Yorker ,The New York Times and the Times Literary Supplement.

He has done fieldwork with the Navajo Indians, the Hamadsha (a Moroccan Muslim confraternity), white South Africans during apartheid, Christian Fundamentalists and legal conservatives in America, and the Harkis (Algerians who sided with the French during the Algerian War of Independence) in France. Among his books, several of which have been translated into German, French, Italian, and Japanese are The Fifth World of Foster Bennett: A Portrait of a Navaho; The Hamadsha; As Essay in Moroccan Ethno-psychiatry; Tuhami: A Portrait of a Moroccan; Waiting: the Whites of South Africa; Hermes’ Dilemma and Hamlet’s Desire: Essays on the Epistemology of Interpretation; Serving the Word: American Literalism from the Pulpit to the Bench: and Imaginative Horizons: An Essay in Literary-Philosophical Anthropology, which was based on the Jansen Memorial Lectures he delivered in Frankfurt am Main.

He is completing a book on the way people recount their lives after a dramatic change of status as well as one on the Harki. He has received awards and grants from, among others, the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Endowment of the Humanities, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique and the Commission Nationale de Cinema, the Mellon Foundation, the Fulbright Commission (Brazil), and the Guggenheim Foundation. He has been a Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Scholar at the California Institute of Technology, and a fellow at the American Academy in Berlin.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Joseph DaubenJoseph Dauben

College: Lehman College
Department: History
Email: jdauben@att.net
Office Phone: (718) 960-8285

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Lehman College and Graduate Center history professor Joseph W. Dauben earned his doctorate from Harvard in 1972, the same year he joined the Lehman faculty. He is the author of two biographies that are considered classics: Georg Cantor: His Mathematics and the Philosophy of the Infinite (Harvard University Press, 1979) and Abraham Robinson: The Creation of Nonstandard Analysis, A Personal and Mathematical Odyssey (Princeton University Press, 1998). In recognition of his singular contributions to the understanding of the development of Chinese mathematics in the Western world, Dauben was elected an Honorary Professor of the Institute for the History of Natural Science, a branch of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in 2002. Only eight other persons have received this honor.He is also a recently-elected member of the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the oldest scientific society in Europe.

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Lehman College Social Sciences

Cathy DavidsonCathy Davidson

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: English, and Futures Initiative
Email: cdavidson@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-7247

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Cathy N. Davidson is a Distinguished Professor in the Ph.D. Program in English at the Graduate Center, The City University of New York, and Director of the Futures Initiative, a new program dedicated to envisioning the future of higher education. Davidson’s main contributions have been in the areas of history of the book, history of industrialism and postindustrialism, and the impact of new technologies on culture, cognition, and learning. She has published more than twenty books including Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America’ Closing: The Life and Death of an American Factory, with documentary photographer Bill Bamberger; The Future of Thinking: Learning Institutions in a Digital Age, with David Theo Goldberg; and, most recently, Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn.Davidson is cofounder and administrative director of the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (hastac.org), a 14,000+ network committed to “Changing the Way We Teach and Learn.” She is co-PI of the HASTAC/John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competitions that have awarded more than $10 million in grant funding to support ninety innovative projects operating in more than twenty countries.
In 2010, President Obama appointed her to serve on the National Council Humanities, and she is the first educator to serve on the Board of Directors of Mozilla. She received the Educator of the Year Award (with HASTAC cofounder Goldberg) from the World Technology Network in 2012. She is currently working on a book on innovation, social justice, and the future of higher education.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Michael DevittMichael Devitt

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: mdevitt@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8620

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Michael Devitt, a student of the famous American empiricist Willard Van Orman Quine at Harvard, where he earned his Ph.D., has argued his realist position steadily over the years. His Realism and Truth is now in its third printing. He was also chosen as the spokesperson for naturalism (opposition to the a priori, or knowledge not derived from experience) in the forthcoming volume, Contemporary Debates in Epistemology, part of a series published by Blackwell that pits prominent philosophers with opposing views against one another. Fighting for scientific realism is just one of Devitt’s preoccupations as a philosopher; he is also an incredibly prolific scholar in the areas of cognitive science and the philosophy of language. In Ignorance of Language (forthcoming) he criticizes Chomskian views of the place of language in the mind. He has been embroiled for thirty years in a revolution in the “theory of reference,” a revolution that was instigated by the world-famous philosopher and logician, Saul Kripke, who also recently joined the philosophy faculty of The Graduate Center.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Linnea EhriLinnea Ehri

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Psychology and Speech–Language–Hearing Sciences
Email: lehri@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8294

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Linnea C. Ehri received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1970 and was a professor at the University of California, Davis, before coming to the Graduate Center in 1991 as a Distinguished Professor. She holds appointments in the Educational Psychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences programs. She has received research awards from the American Educational Research Association, the National Reading Conference, and the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. She has held elected offices in these organizations. She is a member of the Reading Hall of Fame. She served on the National Reading Panel which was commissioned by the U.S. Congress to report on research-based methods of teaching reading effectively to elementary students. Her research and teaching are focused on reading acquisition processes, reading instruction, and the causes of reading difficulties. Some of her findings are summarized below.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Stuart EwenStuart Ewen

College: Hunter College
Department: Film and Media Studies
Email: drstu@bway.net
Office Phone: (212) 772-4950

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Stuart Ewen is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Film & Media Studies at Hunter College, and in the Ph.D. Programs in History, Sociology and American Studies at The CUNY Graduate Center (City University of New York). He is generally considered one of the originators of the field of Media Studies, and his writings have continued to shape debates in the field.He is the author of a number of influential books, including PR! A Social History of Spin (1996) and All Consuming images: The Politics of Style in Contemporary Culture (1987; 1999). The latter provided the foundation for Bill Moyers’ 4-part, Peabody, Emmy, and National Education Association Awards winning PBS series, “The Public Mind.” PR! was a finalist for The Financial Times Global Business Book Award in 1997, and provided the basis for a 4-part BBC Television Series, “The Century of the Self.”

Ewen’s other books include Captains of Consciousness: Advertising and the Social Roots of the Consumer Culture (1976) and Channels of Desire: Mass /images and the Shaping of American Consciousness (also with Elizabeth Ewen. 1982; 1992). In the spring of 2001, Basic Books published a twenty-fifth anniversary edition of Captains of Consciousness. His writings appear in French, Italian, Spanish, Finnish, German, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish, Korean and Japanese translation. He has recently launched and serves as editor of two online publications: Rejected Letters to the Editor and Stereotype and Society.

His most recent book is Typecasting: On the Arts and Sciences of Human Inequality, co-authored with Elizabeth Ewen (2006). Through a series of illustrative, historically situated vignettes, Typecasting presents an incremental interpretation of modern stereotyping through the interwoven fabrics of art, science, religion and popular culture.

He lectures frequently at universities, museums and arts and community centers, both nationally and internationally. Among upcoming engagements, Ewen will be the keynote speaker at major international conferences in Glasgow, Scotland, Sao Paolo, Brazil, and Barcelona, Spain in the fall of 2007. He will be teaching a week-long course in media history at Moscow State University ( Russian Federation) in the spring of 2008.

He is Consulting Editor of Pensar la Publicidad, a new international Spanish language journal published in Madrid. He is also on the editorial board of the Advertising & Society Review, a journal published by the Advertising Education Foundation and Johns Hopkins University Press. In honor of his role in the founding of Media Studies, Ewen’s autobiographical reverie, “Memoirs of a Commodity Fetishist,” was featured as the “Scholarly Milestone Essay” in the journal, Mass Communication and Society, in 2001.

Under the nom de plume Archie Bishop, Ewen has worked as a photographer, pamphleteer, graphic artist, multimedia prankster, and political situationist for nearly thirty years. His work has been exhibited internationally. In 2003-2004, Bishop’s work was part of a traveling international exhibit, ‘Toxic Landscapes,’ funded by the Puffin Foundation, and was also featured in ‘Tactical Action,’ an exhibit at the Gigantic Art Space in Tribeca, New York.

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Hunter College Arts & Humanities

Michelle FineMichelle Fine

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Psychology and Urban Education
Email: mfine@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8710

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Michelle Fine, Distinguished Professor of Social Psychology, Women’s Studies and Urban Education at the Graduate Center, CUNY, has taught at CUNY since 1990. Before that I taught at the University of Pennsylvania for more than a decade. My research focuses on youth in schools, communities and prisons, developed through critical feminist theory and method.Recent awards:

  • 2007 Willystine
  • Goodsell Award 2007
  • AERA SIG, Research on Women and Education
  • Morton Deutsch Award 2005
  • First Annual Morton Deutsch Award
  • Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Bank Street College 2002
  • Honorary Doctoral Degree for Education and Social Justice
  • Gustav Meyer Award for Scholarship Dedicated to Social Justice 2001 with Lois Weis, for the book Construction Sites
  • Teachers College Press
  • Carolyn Sherif Award, American Psychological Association 2001
  • Division 35, Division for Psychology of Women

Selected books published in the past decade:

  • Cammarota, J. and Fine, M. (eds., 2008) Revolutionizing Education: Youth Participatory Action Research in Motion. New York: Routledge Publishers.
  • Sirin, S. and Fine, M. (2007) Designated Others: Muslim American Youth Negotiating Identities Post 9-11. New York: New York University Press.
  • Weis, L. and Fine, M. (2005) Beyond silenced voices (second edition) Albany: SUNY Press. 2006 AESA Critics’ Choice Awards (American Educational Studies Association)
  • Weis, L. and Fine, M. (2004) Working Method: Social justice and social research. New York: Routledge Publishers.
  • Fine, M., Weis, L., Pruitt, L. and Burns, A. (2004) Off white: essays on race, power and resistance. New York: Routledge Publishers.
  • Fine, M., Roberts, R., Torre, M. and Bloom, J., Burns, A., Chajet, L., Guishard, M. and Payne, Y. (2004) Echoes of Brown: Youth documenting and performing the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Fine, M. and Weis, L. (2003) Silenced Voices, Extraordinary Conversations: Re-imagining urban education. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Anand, B., Fine, M., Perkins, T. and Surrey, S. (2002) Keeping the Struggle Alive: Oral Histories of School Desegregation in the North. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Fine, M., & Weis, L. (1998) The unknown city: Lives of poor and working class young adults. Boston: Beacon Press.
  • Guinier, L., Fine, M. and Balin, J. (1996) Becoming Gentlemen: Women, Law School and Institutional Change. Beacon Press.

Selected journal articles and monographs:

  • Fine, M. and McClelland, S. (2007) The politics of teen women’s sexuality: Public policy and the adolescent female body. Emory Law Review, 56, 4.
  • Fine, M. and McClelland, S. (2006) Sexuality education and the discourse of desire: Still missing after all these years. Harvard Educational Review. Fall 2006, 76, 3, 297 – 338.
  • Fine, M., Bloom, J., Burns, A., Chajet, L., Guishard, M., Payne, Y., Perkins-Munn, T. and Torre, M. E. (2005) Dear Zora: A letter to Zora Neale Hurston Fifty years after Brown. Teachers College Record. 107 , 3, 496-528
  • Fine, M. (2004) The power of the Brown v. Board of Education decision: Theorizing threats to sustainability. American Psychologist, Vol. 59, No. 6, 502–510.
  • Fine, M., Burns, A., Payne, Y. and Torre, M.E. (2004) Civics Lessons: The color and class of betrayal. Teachers College Record, 106, November, 2193-2223.
  • Changing Minds: The Impact of College in Prison.
    www.changingminds.ws (Michelle Fine, Kathy Boudin, Iris Bowen, Judith Clark, Donna Hylton, Migdalia Martinez, “Missy,” Rosemarie Roberts, Pamela Smart, Maria Torre and Debora Upegui) 2001. Executive Report on the impact of college on prisoners post-release.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Janet FodorJanet Fodor

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Linguistics and Psychology
Email: jfodor@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8502

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Janet Dean Fodor came to the Graduate Center from the University of Connecticut in 1986 as a distinguished professor of linguistics. She is the author of a textbook on semantics entitled Semantics: Theories of Meaning in Generative Grammar, which has been called “a masterpiece of clarity and good sense.” In this work she combined descriptive linguistic concerns with philosophical issues about the nature of meaning, emphasizing its roots in human psychology. In the late 1970s, she developed a program of research in psycholinguistics, focusing on the psychological mechanisms by which people understand the sentences they read or hear. Her current areas of special interest are cross-linguistic experimental studies of sentence processing and prosody; the role of implicit prosody in silent reading; language learnability theory; and computer simulation studies of children’s acquisition of syntax. She is a former president of the Linguistic Society of America. Dr. Fodor earned a B.A. and M.A. from Oxford Oxford University, and a Ph.D. in linguistics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Nancy FonerNancy Foner

College: Hunter College
Department: Sociology
Email: nfoner@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-5640

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Nancy Foner, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, received her B.A. from Brandeis University and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Her main area of interest is immigration. She has studied Jamaicans in their home society as well as in New York and London, nursing home workers in New York, and has written widely on immigration to New York City. She is particularly interested in the comparative study of immigration – comparing immigration today with earlier periods in the United States, the immigrant experience in various American gateway cities, and immigrant minorities in the United States and Europe.Nancy Foner has thirteen books to her credit, including From Ellis Island to JFK: New York’s Two Great Waves of Immigration (Yale University Press, 2000, winner of the 2000 Theodore Saloutos Award of the Immigration and Ethnic History Society); Not Just Black and White: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Immigration, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States (edited with George Fredrickson, Russell Sage Foundation, 2004, Honorable Mention, Thomas and Znaniecki Distinguished Book Award of the International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association); New Immigrants in New York (Columbia University Press, revised edition, 2001); Islands in the City: West Indian Migration to New York (University of California Press, 2001); Immigration Research for a New Century: Multidisciplinary Perspectives
(edited with Ruben Rumbaut and Steven Gold, Russell Sage Foundation, 2000); and The Caregiving Dilemma: Work in an American Nursing Home (University of California Press, 1994).

Her two most recent books are: Wounded City: The Social Impact of 9/11 (Russell Sage Foundation, 2005), an edited volume that is the product of a Russell Sage Foundation working group that she headed, and In a New Land: A Comparative View of Immigration (New York University Press, 2005). She is also the author of more than 60 articles and book chapters.

Among her other activities, Foner is a member of the Russell Sage Foundation Immigration Research Advisory Committee, the Social Science Research Council Committee on International Migration, and the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island History Advisory Committee. She has testified on immigration issues before several Congressional committees and serves on the editorial board of numerous journals, including International Migration Review, Global Networks, and the Journal of American Ethnic History. She is currently chair-elect of the International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association, and is past president of the Society for the Anthropology of Work as well as the Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology.

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Hunter College Social Sciences

Joshua FreemanJoshua Freeman

College: Queens College
Department: History
Email: jfreeman@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8436

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Joshua B. Freeman is Distinguished Professor of History at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and associated with the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies. He served as Executive Officer of the Ph.D. Program in History from 2003 to 2009 and is currently the Academic Director of the Urban Studies Program at the Murphy Institute. He received a B.A. from Harvard University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Rutgers University. Prior to coming to CUNY, he taught at Columbia University and the College at Old Westbury, State University of New York.Professor Freeman has written extensively about the history of labor, modern America, and New York City. His most recent book, American Empire, 1945-2000: The Rise of a Global Power; the Democratic Revolution at Home, was published by Viking Books in August 2012. His other books include Working-Class New York: Life and Labor since World War II; In Transit: The Transport Workers Union in New York City, 1933 1966; and Audacious Democracy: Labor, Intellectuals, and the Social Renewal of America (with Steve Fraser). His articles have appeared in many academic journals, including Labor History, International Labor and Working-Class History, Journal of American Ethnic History, and Journal of Social History. He has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsday, and The Nation and served as co-editor of International Labor and Working-Class History.

Professor Freeman has received the Philip Taft Labor History Book Award, the New York Society Library Book Prize for History, the John Commerford Labor Education Award, fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and a Queens College President’s Grant for Innovative Teaching Projects.
He has appeared in a number of television documentaries, including Ric Burns’ New York.

Queens College Social Sciences

Nicholas FreudenbergNicholas Freudenberg

College: Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy
Department: Community Health and Social Sciences
Email: nick.freudenberg@sph.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 364-9604

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Nicholas Freudenberg is Distinguished Professor of Community Health and Social Sciences at the Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and on the faculty of the Ph.D. Program in Psychology at The Graduate Center. He also serves as Director of the CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute, a research and action center that provides evidence on equitable solutions to urban food problems. Additionally, Freudenberg is the founder and faculty director of Healthy CUNY, a university-wide initiative to promote academic success by helping CUNY students to get help for the health problems that undermine academic achievement.

For the last 35 years, he has worked with community organizations, government agencies and activists in New York and other cities around the world to develop, implement and evaluate policies and programs to reduce health inequalities and prevent urban health problems such as HIV infection, substance abuse, environmental threats to health, childhood asthma, diabetes and obesity.

He is author of Lethal but Legal Corporations, Consumption and Protecting Public Health (Oxford University Press, 2014), Cities and the Health of the Public (Vanderbilt Press, 2006, with David Vlahov and Sandro Galea), three other books and more than 120 scientific articles and policy reports.

From 1992 to 2007, he led research projects at the Rikers Island Detention Center, New York City’s main jail, assessing the impact of interventions to reduce drug use, HIV risk and rearrest among people returning home from jail. His work has been supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Institute for Drug Abuse, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Open Society Institute, the New York City Department of Health, Tisch Illumination Fund and others.

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Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Community Health and Social Sciences

Fred GardapheFred Gardaphe

College: Queens College
Department: English
Email: fred.gardaphe@qc.cuny.edu

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Fred Gardaphe was born in Chicago in 1952 and raised in Melrose Park, Illinois, a
predominantly Italian American community. His grandparents on his mother’s side emigrated from Bari, Italy. On his father’s side, his grandmother’s family emigrated from Calabria, his grandfather’s family from Canada. He attended Sacred Heart Grammar School, Fenwick Preparatory High School (Oak Park) and Triton College (River Grove) where he earned an Associate of Arts degree in 1973. He earned a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1976), a Master’s Degree in English at the University of Chicago (1982) and his Ph.D. in Literature at the University of Illinois at Chicago (1993) with an emphasis on cultural criticism and American multicultural literature.A leading expert in the field, Gardaphe directed the Italian/American and American Studies Programs at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1998-2008) before coming to Queens College and the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute.

He began his teaching career at the high school level and taught five years in Wisconsin, Iowa, and in an alternative street school in Chicago before taking a position in English and Educational Studies at Columbia College in Chicago. At Columbia he created and taught writing, educational studies, and literature courses and courses in Italian/American film and literature from 1978-1998.

He is Associate Editor of Fra Noi, an Italian American monthly newspaper,
editor of the Series in Italian American Studies at State University of New York Press, and co-founding-co-editor of Voices in Italian Americana, a literary journal and cultural review. He is past President of the American Italian Historical Association (1996-2000), and served as Vice President of the Italian Cultural Center in Stone Park, IL from 1992-1998. He is currently President of MELUS: The Society for the Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States.

His edited books include: New Chicago Stories, Italian American Ways, Shades of Black and White: Conflict and Collaboration Between Two Communities, Cultures, Communities and the Arts, From the Margin: Writings in Italian Americana, and Italian Ethnics: Their Languages, Literature and Lives. He has written two one-act plays: “Vinegar and Oil,” produced by the Italian/American Theatre Company in 1987, and “Imported from Italy,” produced by Zebra Crossing Theater in 1991.

His study, Italian Signs, American Streets: The Evolution of Italian American
Narrative, is based on his dissertation which won the Fondazione Giovanni Agnelli/Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs award for 1993 dissertations) and was published by Duke University Press in 1996; it was named an Outstanding Academic Book for 1996 by Choice. He has also published Dagoes Read: Tradition and the Italian/American Writer and Moustache Pete is Dead!: Italian/American Oral Tradition Preserved in Print. His latest book is From Wiseguys to Wise Men: Masculinity and the Italian American Gangster (Routledge 2006). He is currently at work on a memoir and a study of irony in Italian American art and culture.

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Queens College Arts & Humanities

Azriel GenackAzriel Genack

College: Queens College
Department: Physics
Email: azriel.genack@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-3373

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College in 1984. He is a member of New York State Center for Advanced Technology on Ultrafast Photonics and Applications at the City University. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a member of the Optical Society of America. For the last decade, Dr. Genack has been involved in the study of classical wave propagation in the presence of disorder.

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Queens College Natural Sciences

Peter Godfrey-SmithPeter Godfrey-Smith

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: pgodfrey-smith@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-7093

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Peter Godfrey-Smith grew up in Sydney, Australia. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Sydney, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from UC San Diego. He taught at Stanford, the Australian National University, and Harvard before joining CUNY. His main research interests are in the philosophy of biology and the philosophy of mind, and he also works on pragmatism (especially John Dewey), the history and philosophy of science, and some parts of metaphysics and epistemology. He is the author of Complexity and the Function of Mind in Nature (Cambridge, 1996), Theory and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science (Chicago, 2003), and Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection (Oxford, 2009), which won the 2010 Lakatos Award.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Isaac GoldembergIsaac Goldemberg

College: Hostos Community College
Department: Humanities
Email: igoldemberg@hostos.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 518-6680

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Born in Peru, in 1945, Isaac Goldemberg is a poet, playwright, and fiction writer whose works are known throughout Latin America, Europe and the United States. He has lived in New York since 1964 and is Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Hostos Community College of the City University of New York, where he is also Director of the Latin American Writers Institute, and Editor of the literary journal Hostos Review. He is the author of three novels, two of which have been published in English to great acclaim. His novel The Fragmented Life of Don Jacobo Lerner, already in its 6th English edition, was described in the New York Times Book Review as a moving exploration of the human condition; and was selected by a panel of international scholars convened by the National Yiddish Book Center of the U.S. as one of the 120 greatest Jewish books of the last 150 years.He is also the author of two collections of short stories, thirteen books of poems, and three plays. His poetry and fiction have been translated into several languages, reviewed in dozens of journals and published in numerous magazines and anthologies in Latin America, Europe and the United States. In 1998 the University of Puerto Rico Press published his The Grand Book of Jewish Latin America, a 1250-page anthology of Jewish Latin American writings. His most recent publications are Libro de las transformaciones (a collection of poems, Lima, Peru: Fondo Editorial de la Universidad de San Marcos, 2007), Lección de fe y otras ficciones (a collection of short stories, Lima, Peru: Ediciones COPE, 2007), Décimas y canciones de fino amor (a collection of poems, Lima, Peru: AFA Editores), Tierra de nadie (a collection of short stories, Alexander Street Press, Alexandria, VA, 2006), La vida son los ríos (selected writings, Lima, Peru: Fondo Editorial del Congreso del Perú, 2005), Los Cementerios Reales (a collection of poems, Maracay, Venezuela: Editorial Umbra, 2004), Golpe de gracia ( a play, Maracay, Venezuela: Estival Teatro Editores, 2003), Self-Portraits and Masks (a collection of poems, New York: Cross Cultural Communications, 2002), and El nombre del padre (a novel, Lima, Peru: Alfaguara, 2001). He is also the recipient of the P.E.N. Club of Peru Literature Award (2007), the Orden de Don Quijote (2005), the Instituto Luis Alberto Sánchez Essay Award (2003), the Estival Theater Award (2003), the Amaru Essay Award (2002), the P.E.N. Club of Peru Poetry Award (2001), the Peruvian National Short Story Award (2000), the Nathaniel Judah Jacobson Award (1996), and the Nuestro Award in Fiction (1977). Presently, he is Chairperson of the Advisory Board of the Instituto Peruano de Cultura de Nueva York and Director of the Committee of Peruvian Writers in Exile of the P.E.N. Club International.

The following books have been published about Isaac Goldemberg’s writings:

Zapata, Miguel Angel, ed. El canto del shofar y de la quena: La poesía de Isaac Goldemberg. Mexico: El Tucán de Virginia. Publication date: December, 2007.
Paredes Carbonell, Juan, ed. Isaac Goldemberg ante la crítica: Una visión múltiple . Lima, Peru: Ediciones del Instituto Luis Alberto Sánchez, 2004.
Nouhaud, Dorita. Isaac Goldemberg: Historias de la diáspora. Buenos Aires, Argentina: Acervo Cultural Editores, 2003.
_______. Isaac Goldemberg: El hombre del libro. Lima, Peru: El Santo Oficio, 2003.
Dolan, Maureen, ed. Crossing Cultures in Isaac Goldemberg’s Work. Hanover, NH: Ediciones del Norte, 2003.
_______. Isaac Goldemberg: A Bibliography and Six Critical Studies. Hanover, NH: Ediciones del Norte, 2003.
Sosnowski, Saúl, ed. Isaac Goldemberg: The Esthetics of Fragmentation. Culver City, CA: Antylo Press, 2003.
Zapata, Miguel Angel, ed. Luces de la memoria: Conversaciones con Isaac Goldemberg. Maracay, Venezuela: Editorial Arkadia, 2003
Nouhaud, Dorita. Isaac Goldemberg ou L’homme du Livre. Paris, France: L’Harmattan, 2002.
González Viaña, Eduardo, ed. Identidad cultural y memoria colectiva en la obra de Isaac Goldemberg . Lima, Peru: Mosca Azul Editores, 2001.

Upcoming Events

October 4 and 5 Isaac Goldemberg will launch three new books at the Barcelona International Book Fair.
October 18 Isaac Goldemberg will read his poetry at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C.
October 21 Isaac Goldemberg willdeliver a lecture on his work and on Jewish Latin American literature at the National Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
October 30 Isaac Goldemberg will present his two latest collections of poems at the Americas Society in Manhattan.

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Hostos Community College Arts & Humanities

Carol GouldCarol Gould

College: Hunter College
Department: Philosophy
Email: carolcgould@gmail.com
Office Phone: (212) 396-6502 (Hunter) (212) 817-1940 (the Graduate Center)

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Carol C. Gould is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College and Professor in the Doctoral Programs in Philosophy and Political Science and Director of the Center for Global Ethics & Politics at the Ralph Bunche Institute at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is also Editor of the Journal of Social Philosophy.A native New Yorker, Gould received a BAfrom the University of Chicago and a PhD from Yale University. Prior to joining CUNY in 2009, she taught at Lehman College, Swarthmore College, Stevens Institute of Technology, Columbia University, George Mason University, and Temple University. Her research addresses hard questions in social and political philosophy, with particular attention to the relationship between theory and practice. Her particular interests range across democratic theory, the philosophy of human rights, feminist philosophy, critical social theory, and international ethics.

Gould is the author of Marx’s Social Ontology: Individuality and Community in Marx’s Theory of Social Reality (MIT Press, 1978), which has just appeared in Chinese translation; Rethinking Democracy: Freedom and Social Cooperation in Politics, Economy, and Society, (Cambridge University Press, 1988); and Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights (Cambridge University Press, 2004), which won the 2009 David Easton Best Book Award from the American Political Science Association. She is currently completing a new book entitled Interactive Democracy: The Social Roots of Global Justice, to be published by Cambridge University Press. Her seven edited books include the influential early collection Women and Philosophy (1976), co-edited with Marx Wartofsky; The Information Web: Ethical and Social Implications of Computer Networking (1989); Gender (1999); and Cultural Identity and the Nation-State (2003). She has also published more than sixty articles in social and political philosophy, feminist theory, philosophy of law, and applied ethics. She has given over 150 invited presentations at universities around the world, including more than 30 keynote and plenary addresses at major conferences.

Gould has been active in both the American Philosophical Association and the American Political Science Association, and currently serves as Executive Director of the Society for Philosophy and Public Affairs, and as series editor for global ethics and politics at Temple University Press. She has served as President of the American Society of Value Inquiry, as well as President of the American Section of the International Society of Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (the IVR). She has been the recipient of numerous awards, including fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, a National Science Foundation grant, a Fulbright Senior Scholar Award in Paris, a Fulbright Distinguished Chair Professorship in Political and Social Science at the European University Institute, and a fellowship at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC.

Hunter College Arts & Humanities

Daniel GreenbergerDaniel Greenberger

College: The City College of New York
Department: Physics
Email: greenbgr@sci.ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-5577

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Distinguished Professor Daniel Greenberger’s passion for physics took hold during his days as a student at the Bronx High School of Science in New York City from where he graduated in 1950, in a class that included a handful of others who would go on to become celebrated physicists. Following his graduation from Bronx Science, he earned degrees from MIT and the University of Illinois. He then briefly taught at Ohio State University and University of California, Berkley, before joining the faculty of CCNY, where he is now approaching his 50th year as a contributor to that CUNY college. During those years he also served as visiting scientist/professor at numerous prestigious institutions, including MIT, Technical University of Vienna, Oxford University, and National University of Singapore, among others.Among his most notable achievements is the 1989 publication, in collaboration with Dr. Michael Horne and Dr. Anton Zeilinger, of what is known as the GHZ (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger) Theorem, a significant advancement over John Stewart Bell’s groundbreaking 1964 theorem regarding hidden variable theories in quantum mechanics.

Since that time his research has focused on fundamental problems in quantum theory, mostly using quantum optics. Recently, he has been involved in studying a restricted form of time-travel in quantum theory, and he also conducted a study (with W. Schleich, and E. Rasel) of the relativistic effects possible with atomic and neutron interferometers, and the differences between these techniques.
Some of Professor Greenberger’s other honors include receiving the Humboldt Prize from Germany in 1988 and being elected a fellow of the American Physical Society in 1999, as well as being elected a foreign member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. In the fall of 2011, he had a renewal of a senior scientist award from the Humboldt Foundation, and worked for two months in Ulm, the birthplace of Einstein. He has served as a consultant to the Nobel Prize Committee in physics, and co-founded (with Prof. Zeilinger) the topical group on Quantum Information for the American Physical Society. Additionally, he was the subject of a two-issue festschrift published by the Journal Foundations of Physics in honor of his 65th birthday in 1999, and in 2009, a conference on “Fundamental Problems in Quantum Mechanics” was held at the University of Vienna in honor of his 75th birthday. Professor Greenberg also serves on the editorial boards of a number of journals.

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The City College of New York Natural Sciences

Michael GrossmanMichael Grossman

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Economics and Business
Email: mgrossman@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8262

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Michael Grossman is Distinguished Professor of Economics in the Ph.D. Program in Economics at The City University of New York Graduate Center and Research Associate and Health Economics Program Director at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is the author of four books, fifty-eight journal articles, and thirty-three book chapters. His research has focused on economic models of the determinants of adult, child, and infant health in the U.S.; economic approaches to cigarette smoking and alcohol use by teenagers and young adults; empirical applications of rational addiction theories; the demand for pediatric care; the production and cost of ambulatory medical care in community health centers; and the determinants of interest rates on tax-exempt hospital bonds. His recently completed studies deal with the effects of excise taxes on cigarette smoking by pregnant women; the relationship between substance use and risky sexual behavior by teenagers; the economics of obesity; and the effects of managed care on hospital prices for bypass surgery and for angioplasty. His current research deals with the effects of the introduction of national health insurance and compulsory school reform in Taiwan on child health outcomes in that country.He is a co-editor of the Review of Economics of the Household, an associate editor of the Journal of Health Economics, a series co-editor of Advances in Health Economics and Health Services Research (published by JAI, an imprint of Elsevier Ltd.), a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, President of the Eastern Economic Association, and President-elect of the American Society of Health Economists. He is listed in the 2003 edition of Who’s Who in Economics. He is the past recipient of grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the Ford Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. His current research is funded by grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He has served as the sponsor and chair of 93 completed Ph.D. dissertations and has served as a committee member of an additional 130 completed Ph.D. dissertations.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Godfrey GumbsGodfrey Gumbs

College: Hunter College
Department: Physics and Astronomy
Email: ggumbs@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-3935

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Godfrey Gumbs, who is based at Hunter College and is a faculty member in The Graduate Center’s Ph.D. program in physics, has made important contributions to solid-state physics. His research, which includes a powerful approach to the study of nanostructures, focuses on several areas, including condensed matter physics, plasma physics, optoelectronics, math and computational techniques. A recent recipient of the Edward A. Bouchet Award, one of the highest given by the American Physical Society, he also is a fellow of the American Physical Society, an honor bestowed on no more than one half of one percent of the society’s members. Gumbs earned a B.A. in physics from Cambridge University, an M.Sc. in physics from the University of Toronto, an M.A. in physics from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Toronto.

Hunter College Natural Sciences

Kimiko HahnKimiko Hahn

College: Queens College
Department: English
Email: kimiko.hahn@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-4712

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Kimiko Hahn was born in 1955 in Mt. Kisco, New York, the child of artists, a Japanese American mother from Hawaii and a German American father from Wisconsin. She received an undergraduate degree in English and East Asian studies from the University of Iowa, and a master’s degree in Japanese literature from Columbia University in 1984.She is the author of seven collections of poetry, including The Narrow Road to the Interior (W.W. Norton, 2006); The Artist’s Daughter (2002); Mosquito and Ant (1999); Volatile (1998); and The Unbearable Heart (1995), which received an American Book Award.

Hahn is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts, as well as a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writers’ Award, the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize, and an Association of Asian American Studies Literature Award. She is a Distinguished Professor in the English department at Queens College/CUNY and lives in New York.

(bio courtesy of Poets.org)

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Queens College Arts & Humanities

Robert HaralickRobert Haralick

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Computer Science
Email: haralick@aim.com
Office Phone: (212) 817-8192

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Robert Haralick earned his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. Before coming to The Graduate Center, he held the prestigious Boeing Egtvedt Professorship in Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington and was vice president of research at Machine Vision International. A fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the International Association for Pattern Recognition (where he also held the office of president), he has served on the editorial boards of journals such as IEEE Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, Pattern Recognition, Image and Vision Computing, IEEE Expert, and Machine Vision and Applications. Professor Haralick has authored more than 550 books, chapters, journal articles, and conference papers, among them the seminal two-volume Computer and Robot Vision. He has contributed to image texture analysis, facet modeling for image analysis, shape analysis using mathematical morphology, and in general to computer image processing, computer vision, computer document analysis, and artificial intelligence. His most recent work is in high-dimensional space clustering and pattern recognition techniques applied to combinatorial problems in free group theory.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

David HarveyDavid Harvey

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Anthropology, Earth and Environmental Sciences, and History
Email: dharvey@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-7211

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David Harvey, a leading theorist in the field of urban studies whom Library Journal called “one of the most influential geographers of the later twentieth century,” earned his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, was formerly professor of geography at Johns Hopkins, a Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics, and Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at Oxford. His reflections on the importance of space and place (and more recently “nature”)have attracted considerable attention across the humanities and social sciences. His highly influential books include The New Imperialism; Paris, Capital of Modernity; Social Justice and the City; Limits to Capital; The Urbanization of Capital; The Condition of Postmodernity; Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference; Spaces of Hope; and Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography. His numerous awards include the Outstanding Contributor Award of the Association of American Geographers and the 2002 Centenary Medal of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society for his “outstanding contribution to the field of geographical enquiry and to anthropology.” He holds honorary degrees from the universities of Buenos Aires, Roskilde in Denmark, Uppsala in Sweden, and Ohio State University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Samuel HeilmanSamuel Heilman

College: Queens College
Department: Sociology
Email: samuel.heilman@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-2832

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Samuel Heilman holds the Harold Proshansky Chair in Jewish Studies at the Graduate Center and is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Queens College of the City University of New York. He has also been Scheinbrun Visiting Professor of Sociology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, visiting professor of social anthropology at Tel Aviv University, and a Fulbright visiting professor at the Universities of New South Wales and Melbourne in Australia. He has been a guest lecturer at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Rutgers University, Harvard University, the University of Maryland, Carelton College, Sydney University, Spertus College, the University of Pennsylvania, and Brandeis University, among others. In 1993 he gave the Samuel and Althea Stroum Lectures at the University of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to newspapers and magazines.He is the author of numerous articles and reviews as well as ten books: Synagogue Life, The People of the Book, The Gate Behind the Wall, A Walker in Jerusalem, Cosmopolitans and Parochials: Modern Orthodox Jews in America (co authored with Steven M. Cohen) Defenders of the Faith: Inside Ultra-Orthodox Jewry, Portrait of American Jewry: The Last Half of the 20th Century, When a Jew Dies: The Ethnography of a Bereaved Son and Sliding to the Right: The Contest for the Future of American Jewish Orthodoxy. He is also editor of the Death, Bereavement, and Mourning (Transaction Books, 2005).

A number of these books are recently reissued and all are currently in print.

He is a frequent contributor to a number of magazines and newspapers. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Contemporary Jewry. The Baltimore Sun wrote of Heilman “He is a poet: He has made the familiar seem strange, and the strange, familiar.”

In 2004, Heilman won the Marshall Sklare Memorial Award for his lifetime of scholarship from the Association for the Social Scientific Study of Jewry; he also was awarded the highest university rank of Distinguished Professor of Sociology by the City University of New York. His book, The Gate Behind the Wall was honored with the Present Tense Magazine Literary Award for the best book of 1984 in the “Religious Thought” category.
A Walker in Jerusalem received the National Jewish Book Award for 1987 and Defenders of the Faith was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award for 1992. Portrait of American Jewry: The Last Half of the 20th Century was honored with the 1996 [first] Gratz College Tuttleman Library Centennial Award. When a Jew Dies won both the Koret Award in 2003 and the National Jewish Book Award in 2004. Heilman is also recipient of fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, and the Mellon Foundation. He received a Distinguished Faculty
Award from the City University of New York in 1985 and 1987. He is listed in Who’s Who in the East, Contemporary Authors and Who’s Who in World Jewry. He has been a member of the board of the Association for Jewish Studies and the YIVO Annual and the Max Weinreich Center.

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Queens College Social Sciences

William HelmreichWilliam Helmreich

College: The City College of New York
Department: Sociology
Email: helmreichw@gmail.com
Office Phone: (212) 650-5840

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William B. Helmreich received his Ph.D. in Sociology from Washington University (St. Louis). He is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the Colin Powell School of Civic & Global Leadership at City College of New York and a Professor of Sociology at City University Graduate Center. He is also a Permanent Senior Fellow at Yale University. Helmreich served as Department Chairman for five years at City College and taught at Yale University before coming to CUNY.A former Woodrow Wilson Fellow, Dr. Helmreich is the author or editor of 15 books, including The New York Nobody Knows: Walking 6,000 Miles in the City (Princeton University Press), winner of the 2015 Guides Association of New York City Inaugural Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Book Writing; The Brooklyn Nobody Knows: An Urban Walking Guide (Princeton University Press; What Was I Thinking: The Dumb Things We Do and How to Avoid Them (Rowman & Littlefield); The Things they Say Behind Your Back: Stereotypes and the Myths Behind Them (Doubleday and Transaction Books); Against All Odds: Holocaust Survivors and the Successful Lives they Made in America (Simon & Schuster); Contemporary Issues in Society (McGraw-Hill) with Hugh Lena and William McCord; and The Black Crusaders: A Case Study of a Black Militant Organization (Harper & Row).

Professor Helmreich is currently writing a five book series, one volume on each borough, for Princeton University Press. As a result, he has been walking NYC again. His lifelong interest in the Big Apple was sparked by a game he and his father played when he was a child, called “Last Stop.” Each week they would take a subway to the last stop and walk around the neighborhood. When they ran out of last stops, they went to the second, third, and fourth-to-last stops. As he put it “My father gave me the greatest present a parent can give besides love—-the gift of time.” He has written for The New York Times, Newsday, The Los Angeles Times, and has appeared on Oprah, Larry King, CNN, CBS Morning News, and as a guest anchor on NBC TV News and has been profiled in the New Yorker magazine. A May 2016 segment of Sunday Morning News with Charles Osgood was devoted to his book about New York.

The City College of New York Social Sciences

George HendreyGeorge Hendrey

College: Queens College
Department: Earth and Environmental Science
Email: george.hendrey@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-3325

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Distinguished Professor of Earth and Environmental Science at Queens CollegeProfessional Preparation

Undergraduate-

University of Washington Zoology B.A., 1966

Graduate-

University of Washington Civil Engineering/Water and Air Resources M.S., 1970

University of Washington Civil Engineering/Comparative Limnology Ph.D., 1973

Appointments

2005 – present City

University of New York. Distinguished Professor.

2004 – 2005 Queens College CUNY. Professor.

2001- 2004 Brookhaven National Laboratory. Senior Ecologist (Tenured)

1977 – 2000 Brookhaven National Laboratory. Ecologist.

1976 – 1977 Cornell University. Visiting Research Associate

1973 – 1976 Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA, Oslo)). Staff Scientist

Publications 5 most relevant (out of 129 peer-reviewed publications)

Hendrey G.R., S.P. Long, I.F. McKee, and N.R. Baker. 1997. Can photosynthesis respond to short-term fluctuations in atmospheric carbon dioxide? Photosynthesis
Research 51: 179-184. (BNL 62922).

Hendrey , G.R., D.S. Ellsworth, K.F. Lewin, and J. Nagy. 1999. A free-air CO 2 enrichment system for exposing tall forest vegetation to elevated atmospheric CO 2. Global Change Biology 5: 293-309.
Percy K.E, C.S. Awmack, R.L. Lindroth, M.E. Kubiski,B..J. Kopper, J.G. Isebrands, K.S. Pregitzer, G.R. Hendrey, Richard E. Dickson, Donald R. Zak, Elina Oksanen, Jaak Sober, Richard Harrington, & David F. Karnosky. 2003. Altered performance of forest pests under CO 2- and O 3 – enriched atmospheres. Nature
420, 403 – 407.

Hendrey G.R. and Miglietta F. (2006) FACE technology: p ast, present and future. Chapter 2 in Managed Ecosystems and CO 2: Case Studies, Processes and Perspectives. Springer 459 pp.
Karipot, A., M.Y. Leclerc, G. Zhang, T. Martin, G. Starr, D. Hollinger, L.E. Hipps, McCaughey, D. J. Anderson and G. R. Hendrey. 200x. Nocturnal C02 exchange over a tall forest canopy associated with intermittent low-level jet activity. J. Theor. Appl. Climatology.(accepted).

Synergistic Activities

Head, Earth System Sciences Division, BNL, 1995-2004.
Co-PI for AmeriFlux project using multiple PFT tracers to assist development of CO2 source attribution within a pine forest 2000-2004.
Principal Investigator, FACE Facility Development Project at BNL (1986 – 2004), Establishment and operational guidance of 9 FACE facilities, 1987-2004 including: IGBP/GCTE Core Project “The Response of CO 2-Related Processes in Grassland Ecosystems in a Three-year Field CO 2 Enrichment Study” Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH-Z), Eschikon, 1993-95; Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage-II effects of CO 2 and ozone on northern hardwood trees, USFS/Michigan Technical University, Rhinelander, WI: 1996-current); Effects of CO 2 enrichment on desert vegetation, University of Nevada, DOE Nevada Test Site, 1996-99; Effects of CO 2 enrichment on prairie vegetation, University of Minnesota, Cedar Creek Research Station, 1997-99; Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage – III (FACTS-III/TropiFACE) Prototype Development, with Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama: 1997-99; Effects of CO 2 enrichment on agricultural, Institute for Agroecology, Braunschweig, Germany: 1998-99; and Program Coordinator for the Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) program, a consortium of investigators from national laboratories and universities, supported by DOE and other Federal agencies, 1986 – 2004.
Board of Directors, Black Rock Forest, 1989-1999;
Co-inventor, inelastic neutron scattering (INS) technique for quantification of soil carbon.
Numerous projects relating to acid deposition: Biological Effects Governing Board, National Acid Deposition Program (NADP), 1979-81; EPA Administrator’s Round Table, 1983; US-New Zealand Cooperative Science Program Award (NSF), 1992; Fellow, American Institute of Chemists, 1992; Adjunct Professor, Duke University (by vote of the faculty) 1995-2002; Certified Senior Ecologist, Ecological Society of America; Tenure, Brookhaven National Laboratory.
Conceived and initiated (with Michael Reynolds) the Urban Atmospheric Observatory project for New York City.

Collaborators and other affiliations (past 5 years)

Collaborators – Karnosky, David (Michigan Technical Univ.); Lindroth, Richard (Univ. Wisconsin); Norby, Richard (Oak Ridge National Lab.); Nösberger, Josef (Swiss Fed. Inst. Technol, Zurich); Oren, Ram (Duke Univ.); Pregitzer, Kurt (Michigan Technical Univ.); Reich, Peter B. (Univ. Minnesota); Rogers, Alistair (Brookhaven National Lab.); Schlesinger, William (Duke Univ.); Zak Donald R. (U. Michigan); Wilopolski, Lucian (Brookhaven); King John S.(NC State); Leclerc, Monique (UGA); Karipot, Anand (U. Georgia)

Graduate and Post-Doctoral Advisors – Eugene B. Welch (Univ. Washington), Thomas W. Edmonson ( University of Washington, deceased), Russel F. Christman (Univ. North Carolina).

Advisees – None

Peer reviewing

Agricultural and Forest Meteorology

Australian Journal of Botany

Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

Environmental Management

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Journal of Environmental Quality

Global Change Biology

Plant, Cell and Environment

Water, Air and Soil Pollution

Agricultural Research Service, USDA
Institute of Ecosystems Studies, Millbrook, NY
National Science Foundation
U.S. Department of Energy
Israel Science Foundation
Springer-Verlag (publisher)

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Queens College Natural Sciences

Gabor HermanGabor Herman

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Computer Science
Email: gabortherman@yahoo.com
Office Phone: (212) 817-8193

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Professor Herman received a B.S. and M.S. in Mathematics from the University of London, an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of London. He is a pioneer in the field of computerized tomography (an important medical diagnostic procedure) and the author of several books and well over one hundred articles including several classic works in their fields. Prof. Herman is recognized internationally for his major contributions to image processing and its medical applications. He was the leader of successful medical image-processing groups at SUNY Buffalo and at the University of Pennsylvania and has garnered multiple millions of dollars in research funding. His currents interests include image processing in biological 3D electron microscopy and in X-ray crystallography of materials, as well as various aspects of discrete
tomography.Prof. Herman is a highly accomplished scientist of international distinction and has been awarded honorary degrees from the universities of Haifa in Israel, Szeged in Hungary, and Linkoping in Sweden. Prior to coming to The Graduate Center, he was Hewlett Packard Visiting Research Professor at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute at the University of California-Berkeley.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Dagmar HerzogDagmar Herzog

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History
Email: dherzog@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8468

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Dagmar Herzog is Distinguished Professor of History and the Daniel Rose Faculty Scholar at the Graduate Center, where she teaches courses in Modern European history, the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath, interdisciplinary theory and research methodology, and the histories of gender and sexuality. She received her B.A. (1983) in Political Science and French Literature from Duke University and received her M.A. (1985) and Ph.D. (1991) in History at Brown University. Before coming to the Graduate Center, Prof. Herzog taught for more than a dozen years at Michigan State University. At the Graduate Center, she has conducted extensive comparative and transnational research on how religion and secularization have affected social and political developments in modern Europe. She is the author of Sexuality in Europe: A Twentieth-Century History (Cambridge UP 2011), forthcoming also in Turkish; Sex in Crisis: The New Sexual Revolution and the Future of American Politics (Basic Books 2008); Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in Twentieth-Century Germany (Princeton 2005), which has been translated into German and Japanese; and Intimacy and Exclusion: Religious Politics in Pre-Revolutionary Baden (Princeton 1996; Transaction 2007). She is the editor and coeditor of six anthologies, including, most recently, After the History of Sexuality: German Genealogies With and Beyond Foucault (Berghahn 2012 – with Helmut Puff and Scott Spector); Brutality and Desire: War and Sexuality in Europe’s Twentieth Century (Palgrave Macmillan 2009); and Lessons and Legacies VII: The Holocaust in International Perspective (Northwestern 2007).In her work on contemporary sexuality-related policy and disability rights policy in both Europe and the U.S., Prof. Herzog works closely with public health experts and medical and therapeutic professionals as well as jurists, and she frequently speaks to the media and to non-academic publics; she has also worked as a columnist for the Berlin-based tageszeitung. In addition, Prof. Herzog is active in the work of the Holocaust Educational Foundation. She is the recipient of fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, the Ford Foundation, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She serves as a member of the Board of Editors for the American Historical Review and is currently at work on two new projects: one on the intertwined vicissitudes of disability rights and reproductive rights in the European Union, and one on the politics of the European and American histories of psychoanalysis, trauma, and desire in the postwar era.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

David HimmelsteinDavid Himmelstein

College: Hunter College
Department: Urban Public Health
Email: dhimmels@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (617) 312-0970

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David U. Himmelstein M.D. is a Distinguished Professor of Public Health at CUNY’s Hunter College and a Lecturer in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, where he was previously a Professor of Medicine. He also serves as a staff physician at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx.

He has authored or co-authored three books and more than 125 journal articles, including widely-cited proposals for single- payer health care reform, and studies of patient dumping (which led to the enactment of EMTALA law that banned that practice), the high administrative costs of the U.S. health care system, medical bankruptcy (co-authored with Elizabeth Warren), and the mortal consequences of uninsurance. He co-founded, with Dr. Steffie Woolhandler, Physicians for a National Health Program, who’s 20,000 members advocate for non-profit, single payer national health insurance.

Prior to coming to CUNY, he practiced primary care internal medicine and served as the Chief of Social and Community Medicine at the public hospital in Cambridge, MA.

Dr. Himmelstein graduated from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, completed a medical residency at Highland Hospital in Oakland, California, as well as a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Harvard.

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Hunter College Urban Public Health

Yunping JiangYunping Jiang

College: Queens College
Department: Mathematics
Email: yunping.jiang@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-5848

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Yunping Jiang was born in China and received a B.S. and M.S. in Mathematics from Peking University in Beijing before coming to the United States to pursue his Ph.D. at the CUNY Graduate Center. He subsequently taught at Stony Brook University for two years before joining the faculty of Queens College in 1992 and the Graduate Center in 1998.Professor Jiang has published over five dozen research articles in numerous mathematics journals and serves on the editorial boards of Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, Memoirs of the American Mathematical Society, and Geometry. He is also the author of a monograph on dynamical systems, Renormalization and Geometry in One-Dimensional and Complex Dynamics, and a co-editor of several notable collective works, including Dynamical Systems: Proceedings of the International Conference in Honor of Professor Liao Shantao, Complex Dynamics and Related Topics, and Quasiconformal Mappings, Riemann Surfaces, and Teichmüller Spaces. He is a recipient of numerous grants, including several NSF awards, several CUNY collaborative incentive research grants, multiple PSC-CUNY Awards, and a current Simon Foundation Collaborative Grant for his ongoing work on dynamical systems and complex analysis.

Queens College Natural Sciences

David JoselitDavid Joselit

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Art History
Email: djoselit@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8044

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David Joselit’s art-historical work has approached the history and theory of image circulation in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries from a variety of perspectives, spanning Marcel Duchamp’s strategy of the readymade, in which commodities are reframed as artworks, to the mid-twentieth ecology of television, video art, and media activism, and the current conditions of contemporary art under dual pressures of globalization and digitization. Working as a curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, during the 1980s, Joselit co-organized several exhibitions that helped to define the art of that decade, including Endgame: Reference and Simulation in Recent Painting and Sculpture (1986). He taught in the Department of Art History and Ph.D. Program in Visual Studies at University of California–Irvine from 1995 to 2003, and at Yale University from 2003 to 2013, where he served as Department Chair from 2006 to 2009.Joselit’s art criticism has spanned all visual media and recently has engaged extensively with contemporary painting. He is author of Infinite Regress: Marcel Duchamp 1910–1941 (MIT Press, 1998), American Art Since 1945 (Thames and Hudson, World of Art Series, 2003), Feedback: Television Against Democracy (MIT Press, 2007), and After Art (Princeton University Press, 2012), and he is a contributing author to the second edition of Art Since 1900 (Thames and Hudson, 2011). He is an editor of the journal OCTOBER and a frequent contributor to Artforum.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Saul KassinSaul Kassin

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: Forensic Psychology
Email: skassin@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 557-4505

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Saul Kassin received his Ph.D. in personality and social psychology at the University of Connecticut. In 1984, he was awarded a U. S. Supreme Court Judicial Fellowship, and spent the year at the Federal Judicial Center. In 1985 he was a postdoctoral fellow and visiting professor in the Psychology and Law Program at Stanford University. Dr. Kassin has conducted research on police interviewing, interrogation, and the elicitation of confessions, and on the psychology of eyewitness identifications and testimony. He has also studied the impact of these and other types of evidence on jurors and jury decision-making. Dr. Kassin is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society.He has served on the editorial board of Law and Human Behavior since 1986. He lectures frequently to judges, lawyers, psychologists, and law enforcement groups. He has worked as an analyst for various news media and as a consultant and expert witness in federal, military, and state courts. He has also co-authored or edited a number of scholarly books, including: Confessions in the Courtroom, The Psychology of Evidence and Trial Procedure, The American Jury on Trial: Psychological Perspectives, and Developmental Social Psychology.

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John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

Thomas KessnerThomas Kessner

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History and Urban Education
Email: tkessner@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8437

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Thomas Kessner is a graduate of Brooklyn College (1963) and earned his doctorate at Columbia University in 1975 with distinction. He was appointed as distinguished professor at the Graduate Center in 2005. His special areas of interest are American urban and social history and the history of New York City. He has published several books, including The Flight of the Century: Charles A. Lindbergh and the Rise of American Aviation (Oxford, 2010), Capital City: New York City and the Men Behind America’s Rise to Economic Dominance, 1860–1900 (Simon & Schuster, 2003); Fiorello H. LaGuardia and the Making of Modern New York (McGraw Hill, 1989); and The Golden Door (Oxford, 1977), a study of immigrant life and economic mobility in New York City. His work has garnered awards and fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies. He has served as a consultant to the New York City Board of Education, the Ellis Island Museum, the New York Historical Society, the Museum of the City of New York, and many other scholarly and professional institutions. He was also an associate editor for the Encyclopedia of New York City and has directed more than half a dozen NEH Summer Seminars for College and High School Teachers.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Wayne KoestenbaumWayne Koestenbaum

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: English
Email: wkoestenbaum@aol.com
Office Phone: (212) 817-8323

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Writer, scholar and critic Wayne Koestenbaum is recognized as an important American poet, as one of the founders of queer studies, and as a wide-ranging cultural critic who crosses boundaries of literature, art, music, and popular culture. His book The Queen’s Throat: Opera, Homosexuality, and the Mystery of Desire, published in 1993, had a significant impact on the emerging fields of gender and sexuality studies, as have his groundbreaking essays in influential anthologies.His books of poetry include Ode to Anna Moffo and Other Poems (1990), Rhapsodies of a Repeat Offender (1994), The Milk of Inquiry (1999), and the recent collections Model Homes (2004) and Best-Selling Jewish Porn Films (2006). As a critic, he has published Double Talk: The Erotics of Male Literary Collaboration (1989); Jackie Under My Skin: Interpreting An Icon (1995); Cleavage: Essays on Sex, Stars, and Aesthetics (2000); and Andy Warhol (2001), in addition to The Queen’s Throat.

He is also the author of a novel, Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes (2004), as well as a libretto, Jackie O (composed by Michael Daugherty and commissioned by the Houston Grand Opera). His next book of prose, Hotel Theory, will be published in May 2007.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Victor KolyvaginVictor Kolyvagin

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Mathematics
Email: vkolyvagin@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8563

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Victor Kolyvagin is the first to hold the Mina Rees Chair in Mathematics, named for The Graduate Center’s first president, who was a distinguished mathematician. He is famous for a series of papers produced over several years and culminating in one on “Euler Systems,” which is considered an original, fundamental breakthrough, and which played an important role in Andrew Wiles’s path to his famous proof of Fermat’s last theorem. Among the most significant discoveries in number theory in the past quarter century, his discovery of Euler Systems continues to be used in the ongoing development of the field and has led to breakthroughs in what are known to mathematicians as the Birch and Swinnerton Dyer conjecture for elliptical curves and Iwasawa’s conjecture for cyclotomic fields, along with other significant applications. He earned his Ph.D. in mathematics from Moscow State University, worked at the Steclov athematical Institute in Moscow, and in 1990 received the USSR Academy of Science’s Chebyshev Prize. Most recently he was J.J. Sylvester Professor of Mathematics at Johns Hopkins University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Saul KripkeSaul Kripke

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: skripe@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8624

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Saul Kripke is known as a brilliant logician and one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. While a high-school student in Nebraska, he wrote a series of papers that transformed modal logic and remain canonical works in the field. He became a junior fellow at Harvard in his sophomore year and gave lectures to graduate students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. During the 1960s, Kripke presented his revolutionary theories of reference in a series of lectures, transcribed and published in 1980 as Naming and Necessity. This work sparked a veritable industry of philosophical commentary and criticism, as did another series of lectures, transcribed and published in 1982 as Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language. In 2001, he won the Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy, which is given by the Swedish Academy of Sciences and is the equivalent in its field of a Nobel Prize. He was on the faculty of Rockefeller University, was John Locke Lecturer at Oxford, A. D. White Professor-at-Large at Cornell, and a few years ago retired from Princeton, where he spent much of his career since 1976.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Paul KrugmanPaul Krugman

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Economics
Email: pkrugman@gc.cuny.edu

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Paul Krugman is an American economist, Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. In 2008, Krugman was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his contributions to New Trade Theory and New Economic Geography. The Prize Committee cited Krugman’s work explaining the patterns of international trade and the geographic distribution of economic activity, by examining the effects of economies of scale and of consumer preferences for diverse goods and services Krugman was previously a professor of economics at MIT, and later at Princeton University. He retired from Princeton in June 2015, and holds the title of professor emeritus there. He is also Centenary Professor at the London School of Economics, and was President of the Eastern Economic Association in 2010. As of 2016, Research Papers in Economics ranked him as the world’s 24th most influential economist based on citations of his work. Krugman is known in academia for his work on international economics (including trade theory, economic geography, and international finance), liquidity traps, and currency crisis.Krugman has written over 20 books, including scholarly works, textbooks and books for a more general audience, and has published over 200 scholarly articles in professional journals and edited volumes. He has also contributed more than 750 columns on economic and political issues to The New York Times, Fortune and Slate.

CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Tania LeonTania Leon

College: Brooklyn College
Department: Music
Email: tleon@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 951-5000 x2596

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Tania León born in Cuba, a vital personality on today’s music scene, is highly regarded as a composer and conductor recognized for her accomplishments as an educator and advisor to arts organizations.She has been the subject of profiles on ABC, CBS, CNN, PBS, Univision (including their noted series “Orgullo Hispano” which celebrates living American Latinos whose contributions in society have been invaluable), Telemundo and independent films.

León is the recipient of a 2005 commission from The Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard University. In 1998 she was awarded the New York Governor’s Lifetime Achievement Award and
in 1999 received an Honorary Doctorate degree from Colgate University. León has received awards for her compositions from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the National Endowment for the Arts, Chamber Music America, NYSCA, the Lila Wallace/Reader’s Digest Fund, ASCAP and the Koussevitzky Foundation, among others. In 1998 she held the Fromm Residency at the American Academy in Rome.

In 1969 León became a founding member and first Music Director of the Dance Theatre of Harlem establishing the Dance Theatre’s Music Department, Music School and Orchestra. She instituted the Brooklyn Philharmonic Community Concert Series in 1978 and in 1994 co-founded the American Composers Orchestra Sonidos de las Americas Festivals in her capacity as Latin American Music Advisor. From 1993 to 1997 she was New Music Advisor to Kurt Masur and the New York Philharmonic. She has made appearances as guest conductor with the Beethovenhalle Orchestra, Bonn, the Gewandhausorchester, Leipzig, the Santa Cecilia Orchestra, Rome, the National Symphony Orchestra of South Africa, Johannesburg, the Netherlands Wind Ensemble, Holland, and the New York Philharmonic, among others.

In 2002, León served as President of the Concorso Internationale di Composizione “2 Agosto” in Bologna, Italy. León also traveled to the ISCM World Music Days 2002 in Hong Kong for the World Premiere of Axon.

León has been Visiting Lecturer at Harvard University, Visiting Professor at Yale University, the University of Michigan and the Musikschule in Hamburg. She has received Honorary Doctorate Degrees from Colgate University and Oberlin College. In 2000 she was named the Claire and Leonard Tow Professor at Brooklyn College, where she has taught since 1985. In 2006 Tania León was named Distinguished Professor of the City University of New York.

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Brooklyn College Arts & Humanities

Ben LernerBen Lerner

College: Brooklyn College
Department: English
Email: blerner@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 9517-5000 x3556

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Ben Lerner is an American poet, novelist, and critic. He has received fellowships from the Fulbright, Guggenheim, and Howard Foundations, and is the author of two internationally acclaimed novels, Leaving the Atocha Station and 10:04. He has published three poetry collections: The Lichtenberg Figures, Angle of Yaw, and Mean Free Path. In 2011 Lerner became the first American to win the Preis der Stadt Münster für internationale Poesie. His monograph, The Hatred of Poetry, was published in the summer of 2016. His essays can be found in Art in America, boundary 2, Frieze, Harper’s, The London Review of Books, and The New Yorker, among many other publications. In 2015, Lerner received a MacArthur Fellowship for writing that “offers a new vision for how people can relate to one other—a glimmer of hope in a world beset by inequality, weather catastrophes, and political upheaval. Lerner is transcending conventional distinctions of genre and style in a body of work that constitutes an extended meditation on how to capture our contemporary moment.”

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Brooklyn College Arts & Humanities

Gail LevinGail Levin

College: Baruch College
Department: Fine and Performing Arts
Email: Gail.Levin@baruch.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 312-4062

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An outstanding scholar, biographer and art historian, Professor Levin’s international reputation is based on the 18 books she has written or edited, including her definitive studies of Edward Hopper, her current work on Judy Chicago, and her developing interests in feminist art and Eastern European Jewish immigrant influences on currents of American modernist art. Her work as a curator, particularly at the Whitney Museum of American Art, has deepened the understanding of American modernist art, including abstract impressionism. She has been teaching at Baruch College since 1986 and was a visiting professor at the CUNY Graduate Center in 1979 when she published her first two volumes on Hopper and her work on Synchronism and American Abstractionism. Her work on Hopper was recently cited in the Wall Street Journal as one of the most influential studies of the century and one of the five most influential artist biographies of all time. Besides her many books, Dr. Levin has published numerous articles and given many invited presentations and lectures, both in the United States and abroad. Among her many awards are the Distinguished Fulbright Chair, the National Association of Women Artists Award for Biography and Art History, and the National Endowment for the Humanities grant.

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Baruch College Arts & Humanities

Victoria LuineVictoria Luine

College: Hunter College
Department: Psychology
Email: vluine@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-4223

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Professor Luine received a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pa. and her PhD in Pharmacology from SUNY at Buffalo. Following post doctoral studies and a faculty appointment at Rockefeller University, she joined Hunter College in 1987. In addition to her research and teaching, she is the PD for Hunter College’s RISE and SCORE Programs (NIH grants) which promote research excellence for undergraduate/graduate students and faculty, respectively.As a neuroendocrinologist, Luine researches the neural effects, both behavioral and chemical, of gonadal and adrenal steroids in rats. Her research has shown that, cortisol, when released by chronic stress, impairs cognitive function in males. Recent studies the show surprising results that female rats exhibit an opposite effect to chronic stress, enhanced cognitive function. It appears that the gonadal hormone, estradiol, renders protection to females. However, with aging and the consequent lowering of circulating gonadal steroids and raising of adrenal steroids, stress-dependent responses in the sexes are altered. Behavioral changes in cognition, anxiety and activity levels are associated with altered neurotransmitter and trophic factor levels in specific brain regions.

Recent Publications:

Luine, V.N., Beck, K.D., Bowman, R.E., Frankfurt,
M. and MacLusky, N.J. Stress and neural function – Accounting for sex and age.
Review in J. Neuroendocrinology (In Press).

Luine, VN
and Dohanich, G, Sex differences in cognitive function, in Sex Differences
and the Brain: From Genes to Behavior, JB Becker and A Arnold (eds), Oxford
University Press (In press).

Luine, V.N. Commentary: The prefrontal cortex, gonadal
hormones and memory. Hormones & Behavior 51: 181-182 (2007).

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Hunter College Social Sciences

Gerald MarkowitzGerald Markowitz

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: History
Email: gmarkowitz@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 237-8458

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Gerald E. Markowitz, professor of history at The Graduate Center and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, is the author of 43 articles and nine books. He is the co-author of Deceit and Denial: The Deadly Politics of Industrial Pollution, which was published in 2003 and has been praised for chronicling how the lead paint industry knowingly exposed Americans, including children, to toxic substances. Markowitz was featured in the Bill Moyers documentary, “Trade Secrets,” talking about the material in Deceit and Denial. He also co-authored Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Industrial Disease in Twentieth Century America.

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John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

John MattesonJohn Matteson

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: English
Email: jmatteson@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 237-8586

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John Matteson is Distinguished Professor of English at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. His first book, Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father, was awarded the 2008 Pulitzer Prize in Biography. Eden’s Outcasts was also named as an Honors Book in Nonfiction by the 2008-09 Massachusetts Book Awards and received a commendation from the Massachusetts State Legislature.Professor Matteson’s more recent book, The Lives of Margaret Fuller, was published by W. W. Norton and Company in January 2012. His shorter work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal; The New York Times; New England Quarterly; CrossCurrents; The Harvard Theological Review; and Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, among many other publications. Professor Matteson has received the Distinguished Faculty Award of the John Jay College Alumni Association and the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Achievement by a Ph.D. Alumnus of the Columbia University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. He received his A. B. in History from Princeton, where he graduated cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He earned a J.D. at Harvard Law School and practiced law in California and North Carolina before returning to the academy to earn a Ph.D. in English from Columbia University. He serves on the advisory boards of the Louisa May Alcott Society and the Biographers International Organization. He is a former fellow in residence at the Leon Levy Center for Biography and is currently the deputy director of that center. A native of northern California, Professor Matteson lives in the Bronx with his wife Michelle. Their daughter Rebecca is a member of the Wellesley College Class of 2016.

Professor Matteson’s current scholarly interests include transcendentalism, the development of the the American novel, and interactions between law and literary culture following the Civil War.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice Arts & Humanities

Richard McCoyRichard McCoy

College: Queens College
Department: English
Email: rmccoy@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-4656

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Richard McCoy is a Distinguished Professor of English at Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. He received his B.A. from Stanford University and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to Queens College, he taught as a member of the Society of Fellows at Columbia University. He has been a visiting professor at Peking University and Princeton University and has taught seminars and directed an NEH summer institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library.McCoy is the author of four books – Sir Philip Sidney: Rebellion in Arcadia (Rutgers, 1979), The Rites of Knighthood: The Literature and Politics of Elizabethan Chivalry (California, 1989), Alterations of State: Sacred Kingship in the English Reformation (Columbia, 2002), and most recently, Faith in Shakespeare (Oxford 2013) – as well as numerous articles on Renaissance poetry and Shakespeare’s plays. He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council for Learned Societies, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the Huntington Library.

He is Chair of the Council of Scholars for New York’s Theatre for a New Audience and has served as a speaker and consultant for Shakespeare performances at Classic Stage Company, the Pearl Theater Company, Target Margin, the Public Theater, and the Shakespeare Society, as well as the Royal Shakespeare Company and Canada’s Stratford Shakespeare Festival.

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Queens College Arts & Humanities

Uday Singh MehtaUday Singh Mehta

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Political Science
Email: umehta@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8699

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Uday Singh Mehta, distinguished professor of political science, is a renowned political theorist whose work encompasses a wide spectrum of philosophical traditions. He has worked on a range of issues including the relationship between freedom and imagination, liberalism’s complex link with colonialism and empire, and, more recently, war, peace, and nonviolence. He is the author of two books, The Anxiety of Freedom: Imagination and Individuality in the Political Thought of John Locke (Cornell University Press, 1992) and Liberalism and Empire: Nineteenth Century British Liberal Thought (University of Chicago Press, 1999), which won the J. David Greenstone Book Award from the American Political Science Association in 2001 for the best book in history and theory. In 2002, he was named a Carnegie Foundation scholar. He is currently completing a book on war, peace, and nonviolence, which focuses on the moral and political thought of M. K. Gandhi. He received his undergraduate education at Swarthmore College, where he studied mathematics and philosophy. He has a Ph.D. in political philosophy from Princeton University. Mehta comes
to the Graduate Center from Amherst College, where he was the Clarence Francis Professor in the Social Sciences.

CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Ruth MilkmanRuth Milkman

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Sociology
Email: rmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8771

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Ruth Milkman is a sociologist of labor and labor movements who has written on a variety of topics involving work and organized labor in the United States, past and present. Her most recent book is Unfinished Business: Paid Family Leave in California and the Future of U.S. Work-Family Policy (Cornell University Press, 2013), coauthored with Eileen Appelbaum. She has also written extensively about low-wage immigrant workers in the United States, analyzing their employment conditions as well as the dynamics of immigrant labor organizing. She helped lead a multicity team that produced a widely publicized study documenting the prevalence of wage theft and violations of other workplace laws in Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York, and recently coauthored a study of the Occupy Wall Street movement. In 2012–13 she was the Matina S. Horner Visiting Professor at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute.Milkman’s prize-winning book Gender at Work: The Dynamics of Job Segregation by Sex during World War II (1987) is still widely read and cited. Milkman also published a study of U.S. auto workers, Farewell to the Factory (1997) and a study of immigrant unionism, L.A. Story: Immigrant Workers and the Future of the U.S. Labor Movement (2006). She serves as academic director of the Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies and is on the editorial boards of several journals. In 2013 she was given the Public Understanding of Sociology Award by the American Sociological Association. Milkman taught sociology for more than twenty years at the University of California, Los Angeles, and directed the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment there from 2001 to 2008. In 2009, she returned to the Graduate Center, where she had begun her distinguished career in the 1980s. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Nancy MillerNancy Miller

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Comparative Literature, English, French
Email: nmiller@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8318

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Distinguished Professor Miller’s areas of interest include contemporary autobiography and autobiography theory; women’s writing (American and French); twentieth-century cultural history, after 1945; and feminist theory.
She earned her Ph.D. in French literature, with distinction, from Columbia University. In 1988, after thirteen years of teaching at Columbia College and Barnard College, Dr. Miller accepted an appointment to the Graduate Center as a distinguished professor and began teaching in the Ph.D. Program in English. She was also later appointed to the Ph.D. Programs in Comparative Literature and French.A WWII-era New York child, an early ‘60s graduate student in a largely male academy, and a ‘70s and ‘80s feminist-critic-in-the-trenches, Dr. Miller is one of the founders of the “personal criticism” movement whereby a critic discovers larger truths in meditating on his or her experiences.

Among her selected publications are: The Heroine’s Text: Readings in the French and English Novel, 1722–82 (Columbia University Press, 1980); The Poetics of Gender (Columbia University Press, 1986; paperback edition, 1987); Subject to Change: Reading Feminist Writing (Columbia University Press, 1988; paperback edition, 1989); Getting Personal: Feminist Occasions and Other Autobiographical Acts (Routledge, 1991); French Dressing: Women, Men and Ancien Regime Fiction (Routledge, 1995); Bequest and Betrayal: Memoirs of a Parent’s Death (Oxford University Press, 1996; paperback edition, Indiana University Press, 2000); and But Enough About Me (Columbia University Press, 2002).

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Charles MillsCharles Mills – CV

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: cmills3@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: 212) 817-8619

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Charles W. Mills is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the CUNY Graduate Center. He works in the general area of social and political philosophy, particularly in oppositional political theory as centered on class, gender, and race. He is the author of over a hundred journal articles, book chapters, comments and replies, and six books. His first book, The Racial Contract (Cornell University Press, 1997), won a Myers Outstanding Book Award for the study of bigotry and human rights in America. It has been adopted widely in hundreds of courses across the United States, not just in philosophy, but also political science, sociology, anthropology, literature, African-American, American Studies, and other subjects. His second book, Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race (Cornell University Press, 1998), was a finalist for the award for the most important North American work in social philosophy of that year. Other books are: From Class to Race: Essays in White Marxism and Black Radicalism (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003); Contract and Domination (co-authored with Carole Pateman) (Polity, 2007), which seeks to bring the sexual and racial contracts together; and Radical Theory, Caribbean Reality: Race, Class and Social Domination (University of the West Indies Press, 2010). His most recent book just appeared from Oxford University Press: Black Rights/White Wrongs: The Critique of Racial Liberalism (2017).

Mills has also co-edited the following: Philosophy: The Big Questions (Blackwell, 2003) with Ruth Sample and James Sterba; a special issue of the Du Bois Review on “Race in a ‘Postracial’ Epoch” (Spring 2014) with Robert Gooding-Williams; and Simianization: Apes, Gender, Class and Race (LIT Verlag, 2015) with Wulf D. Hund and Silvia Sebastiani.

Mills received his PhD from the University of Toronto, and previously taught at the University of Oklahoma, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Northwestern University. He is the President of the American Philosophical Association Central Division for 2017-18. In 2017, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the first black philosopher in the history of the organization to be elected under the “Philosophy” category.

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CUNY Graduate Center Philosophy

Pyong Gap MinPyong Gap Min

College: Queens College
Department: Sociology
Email: pyonggap.min@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-2810

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Pyong Gap Min is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He has taught courses on race and ethnic relations, immigration, ethnic identity, marriage and the family, new immigrants and their religions, and Asian Americans. The areas of his research focus are immigrant entrepreneurship, ethnic identity, changes in the family and women’s gender role, and immigrants’ religions, with a special focus on Asian Americans.Methodologically, Min usually combines quantitative data (survey results and public documents), qualitative data (in-depth personal interviews and participant observations), and newspaper articles. Most of his books and journal articles are based on the above-mentioned multiple data sources. Although he has conducted more than 15 surveys of Korean and other Asian immigrants and their children, he has published only a few articles that are based on survey data or public documents alone. He does not believe a work based on quantitative data alone (especially quantitative data involving multivariate analyses) without voices of members of an immigrant or ethnic group and/or the investigator’s insider’s knowledge can capture the reality of the group under consideration. But he also tends to underestimate the value of works based on qualitative data alone whose findings cannot be generalized to the group.

Min is the author of Ethnic Business Enterprise: Korean Small Business in Atlanta (Center for Migration Studies, 1988), Caught in the Middle: Korean Communities in New York and Los Angeles (University of California Press, 1996), and Changes and Conflicts: Korean Immigrant Families in New York (Allyn and Bacon, 1998). Caught in the Middle was selected as the winner of the 1997 National Book Award in the Social Science by the Association for Asian American Studies and a co-winner of the 1998 Outstanding Book Award by the Asia and Asian America Section of the American Sociological Association. The fifth printing of Changes and Conflicts was published in 2002. His most recent book is Ethnic Solidarity for Economic Survival: Korean Greengrocers in New York City (Russell Sage Foundation, 2008). His new book, Intergenerational Transmission of Ethnicity through Religion: Korean Protestants and Indian Hindus, will be published in 2009 by New York University Press.

Min is the editor of Asian Americans: Contemporary Trends and Issues (Sage Publications, 1995), The Second Generation: Ethnic Identity among Asian Americans (Altamira Press, 2002), Mass Migration to the United States: Classical and Contemporary Periods (Altamira Press, 2002), and Encyclopedia of Racism in the United States (Greenwood Press, 2005). The second edition of his edited book, Asian Americans, was also published in 2006 (Pine Forge Press). He is the co-editor of Struggle for Ethnic Identity: Narratives by Asian American Professionals (Altamira Press, 1999), and Religions in Asian America: Building Faith Communities. (Altamira Press, 2002). Encyclopedia of Racism in the United States was selected as one of the 23 best books published in the reference category in 2005 by the Booklist.

Queens College Social Sciences

John MollenkopfJohn Mollenkopf

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Political Science and Sociology
Email: jmollenkopf@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-1646

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John Mollenkopf is Director of the Center for Urban Research at The Graduate Center of the City University and teaches courses in political science and sociology on urban politics, public policy, immigration, and the changing nature of urban communities. He has authored or edited more than a dozen books on urban politics, urban policy, and New York City, recently completing Inheriting the
City: The Children of Immigrants Come of Age (Harvard University Press, forthcoming) with Philip Kasinitz, Mary Waters, and Jennifer Holdaway. This study analyzes educational attainment, labor market outcomes, and political and civic involvement among young adult children of immigrant and native minority backgrounds in metropolitan New York. His work on urban policy includes Place Matters: A Metropolitics for the 21st Century (University Press of Kansas, revised edition 2003), with Peter Dreier and Todd Swanstrom, which won the 2002 Michael Harrington Award from the American Political Science Association. He also co-organized the Russell Sage Foundation’s effort to understand the impact of the September 11th attack on New York City and edited its volume, Contentious City (Russell Sage Foundation 2005). He has extensive expertise in New York City politics, voting behavior, minority participation, immigration, neighborhoods, economic development, urban demographics, and the comparative study of these matters in global cities.Mollenkopf has been involved in many New York City policy issues, serving as a consultant to the Department of Homeless Services, the New York City Law Department, and to the Department of Youth and Community Development, and the New York City Districting Commission. He also serves on the steering committee of the Research Consortium for New York City Schools and is a member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Building Resilient Regions. He earned his MA and PhD degrees from the Department of Government at Harvard University his BA from Carleton College.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Jeffrey MongrainJeffrey Mongrain

College: Hunter College
Department: Art
Email: jmongrai@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (917) 797-8025

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Jeffrey Mongrain is a Distinguished Professor of Art and Art History at Hunter College where he has been on the faculty since 1995 and served as Head of the MFA program in sculpture since 2007. Since arriving at Hunter he has significantly advanced the facilities and instruction in the MFA Sculpture area and has instituted an artist-in-residency program in the undergraduate ceramic area that brings renowned artists to the college where they interact directly with students. He also established two presentation venues, one of which is the Thomas Hunter Project Space. Prior to coming to New York he was a Senior Lecturer at the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland for seven years.
As a practicing artist, Jeffrey Mongrain creates both gallery-based works and site-specific pieces. The sited works are primarily located in spiritual spaces in various countries around the world. As described by Art in America’s contributing editor Eleanor Heartney, “Jeffrey Mongrain brings a human dimension to abstracted yet iconic forms. Obliquely referencing personal metaphor, history, science, sensuality, and the pervasive echoes of sacred spaces, he astutely balances form and content. Mongrain’s richly coded images are visually quiet, physically eloquent and conceptually meaningful.” David Revere McFadden, the chief curator of the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City, stated that “Jeffrey Mongrain takes the viewer on a journey into the world of experience and meaning on several concurrent levels. Physically and visually, Mongrain’s forms are simple, elegant, and even austere, drawing upon the humble elements of the tangible world with which we are entirely familiar and comfortable. The form is revealed with grace and virtuosity. At the same time, each of these simple forms encase mysteries; these are the signifiers of association, reference, memory, and science that inhabit Mongrain’s world.”Currently, Mongrain’s artwork is represented by the Perimeter Gallery of Chicago and Loveed Fine Arts in New York City. His work is also included in the permanent collections of 31 art museums around the world, including the Museum of Arts and Design; Sharjah Museum in the United Arab Emirates; Museum of Modern Art in the Dominican Republic; Museo di Arte Sacred di San Gabriele in Teramo, Italy; Diego Rivera Museum in Mexico; The National Museum in Newcastle, Australia; Yingge Ceramics Museum in Taiwan; Incheon Museum in South Korea, Museo de Antropología de Xalapa in Mexico; Museu de Ceràmica de l’Alcora in Castellón, Spain; Daum Museum of Contemporary Art in Sedalia, Missouri; and the Schien-Joseph International Museum of Contemporary Art at Alfred University in New York State.

In 2011, Professor Mongrain gave a five-hour oral history to the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Art. Subsequent to this, his artistic career is being documented every year by a Smithsonian historian for inclusion in the Archives. In 2007, a mid-career retrospective that included a published monograph was held at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art. Following the show at the Daum, the exhibition was featured at five other museums across the U.S. Mongrain has also had solo exhibitions at the Faenza Museum of Contemporary Art in Italy, Yingge Ceramics Museum, Incheon Museum, The National Museum in Australia, Schien-Joseph International Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Dominican Republic’s Museum of Modern Art, among others. He has represented the United States in numerous museum biennials and triennials, including those of the Museum of Arts and Design (2003); Angewandte Kunst in Frankfurt, Germany (2003); Sharjah Museum (2002); Andenne Museum in Belgium (2010); Museum of Modern Art in Slovenia (2012); as well as at the Berlin Biennial (2012). In addition to his works that are shown in museums and galleries, Mongrain has produced 21 site-specific installations in Cathedrals and Synagogues throughout the U.S., Europe, Mexico, and Australia, and at the Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia.

Professor Mongrain has been the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, including a grant from the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA), The George Millard Fellowship, The Silver Award from the Korean Biennial, the Purchase Award for the Sharjah Biennial, the Ford Fellowship, the Dominican Republic Triennial Purchase Award, the Bush Foundation award, the Bronze Award for drawing from Australia, and the CUNY Presidential Award for Excellence in Creative Activity.

His work has been favorably reviewed in: Art in America, ARTnews, The Boston Globe, the Chicago Tribune, The Korea Times, the London Times, The New York Times, NY Arts, Sculpture, Paris Art, Arte & Artes International, and World Sculpture News, to name a few.

In addition to his teaching at Hunter, he has been a guest lecturer at the Royal College of Art in London; Columbia University in New York City; Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield, MI; Cristóbal Colón University in Vera Cruz, Mexico; Art Institute of Chicago; California College of Art in Oakland, CA; Frank Mohr Institute in Groningen, Holland; Temple University in Rome, Italy; Museum of Glass in Tacoma, WA; and the Newcastle Regional Art Museum in Australia.

Mongrain received his MFA from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, and his BFA from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

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Hunter College Arts & Humanities

Fred NaiderFred Naider

College: College of Staten Island
Department: Chemistry
Email: naider@mail.csi.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 982-3896

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Dr. Fred Naider’s distinguished career combines the qualities of an extraordinary researcher and teacher. He is one of a very select group of scientists recognized by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with over 30 continual years of funding for his important and continuous research.A chemist by training, Dr. Naider has spent the best part of his career studying peptides, a family of molecules formed by linking amino acids in a certain order. His lab at CSI builds “designer” peptides, which he supplies to research labs around the world.

In addition to his work in the United States, Dr. Naider spent many years working at Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science. His research there focused on biological projects, with a specialty in peptide interactions with cells and their movement through cell membranes. While at Weizmann, Dr. Naider worked closely with acclaimed chemist Ephraim Katzir, one of the founding scientists of the Institute, who in subsequent years became the fourth president of Israel.

Dr. Naider’s career path seemed to be moving toward working for a major company as a chemical engineer; however, he chose to pursue a career as an educator, saying “I decided that my first love was the quest for knowledge and sharing that quest with young minds. So, I chose academia where I would have the freedom to pursue those goals.”

Biography and Titles

Dr. Naider received his BS and MS degrees in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University in 1966 and his PhD from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. He began his academic career at The City University of New York’s Richmond College in 1973 as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

Dr. Naider was recently elected American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow for his scientifically and socially distinguished efforts in the advancement of science, being particularly honored for his research contributions in peptide sciences with an emphasis on peptide transport into cells and how peptide hormones induce signal transduction via G protein coupled receptors.

In addition to being a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the College of Staten Island (CSI) and the Graduate School of The City University of New York, Dr. Naider is also the holder of CSI’s Leonard and Esther Kurtz Term Professorship in support of the innovative polymer and biopolymer chemistry programs at the College.

Dr. Naider presently serves as a Councilor of the American Peptide Society and the Chair of the Breakthroughs in Bioscience Subcommittee of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental biology (FASEB). He is on the Board of the Research Foundation of The City University of New York, and was a permanent member of the Bio-organic and Natural Products and Synthetic and Biological Chemistry B Study Section of the National Institutes of Health.

He has been married to his wife Anita for 40 years and is the father of four children and 12 grandchildren.

College of Staten Island Natural Sciences

V. Parameswaran NairV. Parameswaran Nair

College: The City College of New York
Department: Physics
Email: vpn@sci.ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-5572

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Nair obtained his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of Kerala, India, and his Ph.D. from Syracuse University. He was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (1983-1985) and the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Santa Barbara (1985-1986), before joining Columbia University as a faculty member in 1987. He moved to CUNY in 1993.Nair’s research covers a wide spectrum of topics in high energy physics, from solitons, anyons, quark-gluon plasma to Chern-Simons theories and noncommutative geometry. Among his significant contributions are the early identification of the connection of twistors and scattering amplitudes in gauge theories and the use of Hamiltonian techniques in elucidating the nonperturbative structure of Yang-Mills theories.

Nair’s current interests include Theoretical High Energy Physics and Quantum Field Theory, particularly noncommutative geometry and gravity, nonperturbative structure of Yang-Mills theories, twistors and scattering amplitudes.

In addition to well over a hundred research papers, he is also the author of a book, Quantum Field Theory: A Modern Perspective, published by Springer in 2005.

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The City College of New York Natural Sciences

David NasawDavid Nasaw

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History
Email: dnasaw@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8431

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David Nasaw has been on the doctoral faculty at the Graduate Center since 1990. He is currently the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Professor of American History as well as the director of the Center of Humanities at the Graduate Center. He is also the author of The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst, which won the Bancroft Prize and the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books include Going Out: The Rise and Fall of Public Amusements, Children of the City: At Work and at Play, and Schooled to Order: A Social History of Public Schooling in the United States.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Stephen NealeStephen Neale

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: sneale@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8615

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Stephen Neale is generally acknowledged as one of the best philosophers of his generation in the English-speaking world, and the best working at the interface between philosophy of language and linguistics. Neale is known internationally for producing a large body of scholarship related to descriptions, pronouns, quantification, and demonstratives, and his two books Descriptions and Facing Facts, have both been tremendously influential. He has served as an advisor to the Department of Justice on linguistic, logical, and philosophical issues, particularly in connection with Internet filtering technology. Neale holds a B.A. from University College London, and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. He comes to the Graduate Center from Rutgers University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Elizabeth NunezElizabeth Nunez

College: Hunter College
Department: English
Email: elizabeth.nunez@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-4051

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Elizabeth Nunez emigrated from Trinidad after completing high school there. She received her MA and Ph.D. in English from New York University and is CUNY Distinguished Professor of English at Hunter College.Dr. Nunez is the award-winning author of six novels: Prospero’s Daughter; Grace; Discretion; Bruised Hibiscus; Beyond the Limbo Silence; and When Rocks Dance. Prospero’s Daughter, her most recent novel, was a March 2006 Editor’s
Choice in the New York Times. The Times calls Nunez “a master of pacing and plotting,” and says that Prospero’s Daughter is “gripping and richly imagined.” Prospero’s Daughter was named 2006 Best Novel of the Year by Black Issues Book Review and was the 2006 One Book, One Community selection for the Florida Center for the Literary Arts, celebrated at the 2006 Miami International Literary Festival. Bruised Hibiscus won a 2001 American Book Award, Discretion was short-listed for the 2003 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and Beyond the Limbo Silence won the 1999 Independent Publishers Book Award in the multicultural category. In its review of Nunez’s novel Grace, Publisher’s Weekly says that the prose is “exquisitely tuned” and that the narrative unfolds with “understated elegance.” The Seattle Times comments that “ Discretion delivers two memorable characters whose personal culture clashes, both shared and internalized, are as telling as those of the world they inhabit.” Black Issues Book Review describes Bruised Hibiscus as “moving, powerful and haunting” and Booklist says of Beyond the Limbo Silence that Nunez has a writing style that “will remind many of Toni Morrison and Alice Walker.” Beyond the Limbo Silence was also picked by the Washington Post as one of the best books of 1998.

Dr. Nunez is co-editor with Jennifer Sparrow of the anthology Stories from Blue Latitudes: Caribbean Women Writers at Home and Abroad and author of several monographs of literary criticism, with emphasis on Caribbean literature. She is a former fellow of Yaddo and MacDowell artist colonies. A cofounder of the National Black Writers Conference, and director from 1986-2000, Nunez received grant awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as grants from The Nathan Cummings Foundation and the Reed Foundation for these conferences. She is executive producer of the 2004 NY Emmy-nominated CUNY TV series Black Writers in America. Her audiobooks include Grace and Prospero’s Daughter (BBC/America) and Discretion (Recorded Books).

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Hunter College Arts & Humanities

James OakesJames Oakes

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History
Email: Email: joakes@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: 212-817-8439

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One of the leading historians of 19th century America, Professor Oakes has an international reputation for path-breaking scholarship. In a series of influential books and essays, he tackled some of the most important questions about the history of the United States from the Revolution through the Civil War. His early work focused on the South, examining slavery as an economic and social system that shaped Southern life. His more recent work examined antislavery thinking in the north and the political processes that led to emancipation. His books, The Ruling Race (1982; second edition 1998), Slavery and Freedom: An interpretation of the Old South (1990) and the latest The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics (2007) are considered pioneering and influential, each having changed the way historians now consider antebellum planters, American slavery and the Old South.An alumnus of Baruch College, Dr. Oakes holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California/Berkeley. He has been on the faculty of the CUNY Graduate Center since 1997 and the holder of the Graduate School Humanities Chair since 1998. Prior to coming to CUNY, he taught at Princeton University and Northwestern University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Loraine OblerLoraine Obler

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Linguistics and Speech—Language—Hearing Sciences
Email: loraine.obler@gmail.com
Office Phone: (212) 817-8809

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Loraine K. Obler’s international reputation is based on her groundbreaking work in several areas of neurolinguistics: aphasia, bilingualism, aging, and dementia. She came to the Graduate Center in 1985, and was appointed as a distinguished professor in June 1991. She teaches in the Ph.D. Programs in Speech–Language–Hearing Sciences and Linguistics and also directs the Neurolinguistics Lab, where she continues her prior work on the language changes of healthy aging, the brain bases of bilingualism, cross-language studies of aphasia in monolinguals (e.g., Korean), bilinguals, and multilinguals. As co-principal investigator with Martin Albert of the NIH- and VA-funded Language in the Aging Brain Laboratory (1976–present), she is also affiliated with Boston University School of Medicine and Graduate School, Boston University Gerontology Center, and the Harold Goodglass Aphasia Research Center of the Boston Veterans Administration Healthcare System.Dr. Obler has published widely. She and Kris Gjerlow co-authored Language and the Brain (Cambridge University Press, 1999), which has been translated into Italian (2000), Spanish (2001), Japanese (2002) Portuguese (2002), and Arabic (2009). With Lise Menn, Michael Patrick O’Connor, and Audrey Holland, she co-authored Non-fluent Aphasia in a Multilingual World (Benjamins, 1995). While at the Harold Goodglass Aphasia Research Center, Lise Menn and she co-edited the three volumes of Agrammatic Aphasia: A cross-language narrative sourcebook (John Benjamins, 1985). With Deborah Fein, she co-edited The Exceptional Brain: Neuropsychology of Talent and Special Abilities (Guilford, 1988). With Martin Albert, she co-authored The Bilingual Brain: Neuropsychological and Neurolinguistic Aspects of Bilingualism (Academic Press, 1978).She has also co-edited eight books on language in adults, including, most recently, Clinical Communication Studies in Spanish Speakers: From Research to Clinical Practice with José Centeno and Raquel Anderson (Multilingual Matters, 2007); and she has contributed numerous chapters and articles to books and scholarly journals.

Dr. Obler received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Michigan, completing her dissertation on grammaticalization in Arabic while moving into her current field, neurolinguistics, through working in, and heading in 1976, the Aranne Laboratory of Human Neuropsychology at the Neurology Department of Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem. Among the honors and awards accorded her are two Fulbright Awards to Israel (Hebrew University and Bar Ilan University) and a Lady Davis Award for a Visiting Professorship at Hebrew University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Ursula OppensUrsula Oppens

College: Brooklyn College
Department: Music
Email: uoppens@gmail.com

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Ursula Oppens is one of the few pianists before the public today who has won equal renown as an interpreter of the established repertoire and a champion of contemporary music. Her performances of music old and new are marked by a powerful grasp of the composer’s musical intentions and an equally sure command of the keyboard’s resources; qualities placing her in the ranks of the
world’s foremost interpreters.

Brooklyn College Arts & Humanities

Robert PaaswellRobert Paaswell

College: The City College of New York
Department: Civil Engineering
Email: paaswell@utrc2.org
Office Phone: (212) 650-8072

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Dr. Robert Paaswell, Distinguished professor of Civil Engineering (CCNY) currently serves as Director of the federally supported University Transportation Research Center, located at the City College of New York. A consortium of 12 major U.S. Academic Institutions, the Center asserts a significant role in the region and nationally, conducting research and projects on surface transportation, carrying out training and educational programs and actively disseminating the results of its work. Paaswell has been named Director of the City University Institute for Urban Systems, a major University -wide initiative to examine the intersection of new technology, changing institutional structure and innovative finance on the provision of infrastructure in the 21st Century.Previously he served as Executive Director (CEO) of the Chicago Transit Authority, the nation’s 2nd largest transit company. Paaswell is extremely active in Public Transportation Issues and consulting. He has reported on governance structures for U.S. Transit organizations, Public -Private issues in New York and Chicago, Labor Union/Management issues, and training for new technologies. Paaswell served as the Impartial Expert for a path breaking negotiation for NYCT to arrive at maintenance hours for core bus maintenance tasks. He is currently working on Transit Investment Strategies and Innovative Transit System Design. Paaswell recently completed a study of Drivers of Capital Cost Escalation for FTA, and an analysis of Capital Budget Issues for the NY MTA. Paaswell serves on the MTA Blue Ribbon Commission on Construction Excellence, and the MTA Blue Ribbon Commission on Workforce Development. He also serves on the Governor’s Commission on Higher Education.

He served as Chairman of the Board of the Transit Standards Consortium, and on the Boards of the Transportation Research Board and the Transit Cooperative Research Program. He currently chairs the ASCE Committee on Peer Review of Public Agencies. Paaswell is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a recipient of the USDOT Secretary’s Medal for Superior Service. Paaswell received his PhD from Rutgers and was the recipient of the Rutgers Outstanding Civil Engineering Alumnus Award. He is a Member of the New York Academy of Sciences. He has published extensively.

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The City College of New York Natural Sciences

Victor PanVictor Pan

College: Lehman College
Department: Mathematics and Computer Science
Email: victor.pan@lehman.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 960-8568

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Born in 1939 in Moscow, USSR, I received my MS (1961) and PhD (1964) degrees in Math from the Moscow State University (MGU). Math provided me with few keys that opened many locks. Later I leaned towards Computational Math, not the mainstream then but much more so by now. My Russian journal papers on polynomial computations made me known in the West as “polynomial Pan”. In 1976 I left the oppressive communist regime for freedom in the USA, where I met many leading experts in my field and worked with them. Since “perestroika” I have also participated in math and computer science conferences in Moscow and St. Petersburg and visited my Russian friends and colleagues. I like to attack fundamental problems even if they have long defied efforts of researchers. In 1978 I accelerated matrix multiplication, which was a central topic but in stalemate for a decade. Experts applauded me (D.E.Knuth: “the nicest paper of the year”), and rapid progress resumed. For another example, solving a polynomial equation has been the most basic problem in Math and Computational Math for 4000 years (from the Sumerian times) and is still important, but my fastest solution of 1995 remains unbeaten.I seek links among seemingly unrelated subjects and techniques and try to unify such techniques into a single more powerful method. Sciences, engineering and signal and image processing largely rely on matrix and polynomial computations. In two books (one with D.Bini) and many papers I found and exploited various new links between these two areas, particularly via structured matrices. This work has lead to practical computational advances and has substantially contributed to the rapidly advancing field of unifying symbolic and numerical computations. I have enjoyed excellent environments and collaborations in various Universities and Research Centers, but since 1989 I have been working in CUNY, except for sabbatical leaves. I have been teaching CUNY students and publishing joint papers with some of them in journals and conference proceedings (thus helping students to enter research). So far I have guided and mentored about 20 PhD defenses in Math and Computer Science.

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Lehman College Natural Sciences

Rohit ParikhRohit Parikh

College: Brooklyn College
Department: Computer and Information Science
Email: rparikh@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 951-5000 x2058

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Rohit Parikh is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Mathematics and Philosophy, Graduate Center, and Dept. of Computer Science, Brooklyn College.. All his degrees, one in Physics, and two in Mathematics, are from Harvard. Apart from CUNY, he has taught at Boston University, Stanford, NYU, Bristol University (in UK), and Panjab University (in India).

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Brooklyn College Natural Sciences

Jeffrey ParsonsJeffrey Parsons

College: Hunter College
Department: Psychology
Email: jeffrey.parsons@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: 212-772-5533

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Dr. Parsons is Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Public Health at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Dr. Parsons joined the Hunter College faculty in 2000 and served as Chair of the Department of Psychology from 2008 to 2010. Professor Parsons’ work has shed important light on health behaviors, including HIV prevention, HIV medication adherence, sexual behavior, and substance abuse; as well as GLBT issues. His pioneering research has resulted in interventions designed to change risky sexual and drug use behaviors.Since 1996 he has been the Founder and Director of the Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST; www.chestnyc.org), whose projects are based on theories of health behavior change designed to reduce the spread of HIV and improve the lives of persons with HIV. CHEST focuses on the identification and promotion of strategies that prevent the spread of HIV and that improve the lives of people living with HIV. Dr. Parsons has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous research grants with NIH and CDC, particularly focused on the development and evaluation of behavioral interventions. His current research focuses on gay male couples, sexual risk behaviors, drug/alcohol use, sexual compulsivity, and HIV medication adherence. He is an expert in the use of motivational interviewing as a strategy of HIV/AIDS-related behavior change.

Professor Parsons has been a member of the White House Office on National AIDS Policy HIV and Aging Working Group since 2010, when he was also named to the Social and Behavioral HIV Prevention Research Think Tank by the National Institutes of Health Office on AIDS Research. He served as Chair of the Behavioral and Social Consequences of HIV (BSCH) Study Section of the National Institutes of Health from 2010 to 2012. Since 2010 he has been a member of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene HIV and Alcohol and Other Drug Use Advisory Panel. From 2005 to 2007 he was President of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS), Eastern Region. Dr. Parsons edited the book Contemporary Research in Sex Work (Haworth Press, 2005), has been editor of the journal Sexuality Research and Social Policy since 2011, and is also an Associate Editor of Archives of Sexual Behavior and AIDS and Behavior.

A Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Society for Behavioral Medicine (SBM), and SSSS, his many honors include the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the APA in 2008 and the John Money Award from SSSS in 2011. In 2004 he was honored by the APA for Outstanding Contributions to the Advancement of Public Interest Policy. Professor Parsons received Hunter College’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Applied Scholarship in 2007. He received his BA in Psychology at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA, and his MA and PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Houston.

Professor Parsons lives in Teaneck, NJ with his partner Chris and son Henry. He is an accomplished SCUBA Diver and active with a number of non-profit organizations dedicated to GLBT families and parenting, including Family Equality Council and Men Having Babies (a group that provides support for gay men pursuing fatherhood).

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Hunter College Social Sciences

Steven PenrodSteven Penrod

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: Psychology
Email: spenrod@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 237-8877

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Steven Penrod earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 1974 and his Ph.D. in Psychology from Harvard University in 1979. He joined the faculty of John Jay College of Criminal Justice as a Distinguished Professor of Psychology in the fall of 2001. Prior to that he was professor and director of the Law/Psychology program at the University of Nebraska from 1995-2001. He was on the law faculty at the University of Minnesota from 1988-1995 and the psychology faculty at the University of Wisconsin from 1979-1988. His teaching interests include psychology and law, research methods, multivariate data analysis, meta-analytic methods, social psychology, and dispute resolution. His research interests include jury decision-making, eyewitness reliability, the death penalty, media influences, procedural justice, dispute resolution, and the use of social scientific evidence.

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John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

Frances PivenFrances Piven

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Political Science and Sociology
Email: Fpiven@hotmail.com
Office Phone: (212) 817-8674

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Frances Fox Piven is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Political Science at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her scholarship and activism have centered on social movements, electoral politics, and welfare policy.She received her B.A. in City Planning from the University of Chicago, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. She has taught in the Columbia University School of Social Work and at Boston University, and has been on the faculty of the Graduate Center since 1982.

In the early 1960’s, Professor Piven worked as a research associate at one of the country’s first anti-poverty agencies, Mobilization for Youth, and in 1966, she helped found the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO), a grass-roots organization of welfare recipients. Her book with co-author Richard Cloward, Regulating the Poor (1972), analyzed the historical roots of welfare, arguing that welfare rolls expand in response to mass disorder and electoral shifts, and that advances the poor have made resulted from their ability to disrupt institutions that depend on their cooperation.

Professor Piven has studied voter registration and participation patterns, and in 1983 helped found HumanSERVE, an organization that promoted easy access to voter registration. The organization’s approach was incorporated in the “Motor Voter Bill” passed in 1993.

She co-authored Poor People’s Movements (1977), which analyzed 20th century protest movements, and argued that organization-building is less effective than mass disruptive power. Her other co-authored books include The New Class War (1982), The Mean Season (1987), The Breaking of the American Social Compact (1997), and Why Americans Don’t Vote (1998). She campaigned against welfare cutbacks in the 1980s and 1990s. In 1992, she edited Labor Parties in Postindustrial Societies, a collection of essays on the impact of globalization on Left political parties. Her most recent book is Challenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America (2006).

Professor Piven has served on the boards of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Democratic Socialists of America. She is currently the Editorial Board Chair of the New Press, is a Left Forum board member, and is outgoing President of the American Sociological Association. Under her leadership, the ASA conference’s theme was “Another World Is Possible,” echoing the slogan of the World Social Forum. She used her tenure to challenge fellow sociologists to respond to current neo-liberal policies by searching for political strategies that might affect “reform and transformation.”

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Henry PontellHenry Pontell

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: Sociology
Email: hpontell@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 887-6122

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Henry N. Pontell is Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Sociology. Before joining the faculty of John Jay College of Criminal Justice in January 2015, he was a Professor at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), where he now is a Professor Emeritus of criminology, law & society in the School of Social Ecology and of sociology in the School of Social Sciences. At UCI he served as Chair of the Department of Criminology, Law & Society, Director of Graduate Studies in Social Ecology, Associate Dean of Graduate Studies for the campus, and Faculty Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Research. He has also held visiting appointments at the Australian National University, the University of Virginia, the University of Melbourne, the University of Macau, Macau University of Science and Technology, the University of Hong Kong, and Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan.
At UCI he conceived and led the development of the Master of Advanced Study (MAS) Program in Criminology, Law and Society, which in 2003 became the first online degree program at the University of California. The MAS was rated #1 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report in its first ranking of online criminal justice graduate programs in January 2015, immediately following his tenure as director.
Among other awards and honors, Dr. Pontell has received the Albert J. Reiss, Jr. Distinguished Scholarship Award from the American Sociological Association, the Donald R. Cressey Award from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, the Paul Tappan Award from the Western Society of Criminology, the Herbert Bloch Award from the American Society of Criminology, and the Gil Geis Lifetime Achievement Award from the National White Collar Crime Center. He is a Fellow in the Centre for Criminology at the University of Hong Kong, and is a recipient of the Cecil and Ida Green Honors Chair at Texas Christian University, and the Daniel G. Aldrich Jr. Distinguished University Service Award at UC, Irvine.
He has published over one-hundred scholarly articles and book chapters in the fields of sociology, law and society, criminology, and criminal justice. His books include International Handbook of White-Collar and Corporate Crime (Springer), Social Deviance (McGraw Hill), Profit Without Honor: White-Collar Crime and the Looting of America (Pearson, Prentice-Hall), Big Money Crime: Fraud and Politics in the Savings and Loan Crisis (University of California Press), A Capacity to Punish: The Ecology of Crime and Punishment (Indiana University Press), Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice: Essays in Honor of Gilbert Geis (Pearson , Prentice Hall), and Prescription for Profit: How Doctors Defraud Medicaid (University of California Press).
Dr. Pontell has served as Vice-President of the American Society of Criminology and President of the Western Society of Criminology, and is an elected Fellow of both organizations. He is currently President of the White-Collar Crime Research Consortium of the National White-Collar Crime Center.

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John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

Graham PriestGraham Priest

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: gpriest@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8624

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Graham Priest, BA, MA (Cambridge) MSc, PhD (London), LittD (Melbourne), FAHA, was born in London, and studied at Cambridge and the London School of Economics. In 1976 he moved to Australia, where he has since held positions at the Universities of Western Australia, Queensland, and Melbourne. Before joining CUNY in 2009, he was Boyce Gibson Professor of Philosophy at the University of Melbourne.
He is also Arché Professorial Fellow at the University of St Andrews in Scotland.Graham is well known for his work on logic, metaphysics, and the history of philosophy – and in particular for his controversial view that some contradictions are true (dialetheism). His books include: In Contradiction, Beyond the Limits of Thought, Doubt Truth to be a Liar, Towards Non-Being, and Introduction to Non-Classical Logic, three of which have gone into second editions. However, his philosophical interests are much wider than this; in recent years, for example, he has been exploring issues in Buddhist philosophy.

For relaxation, Graham practices karatedo. He is a fourth dan in Shitoryu, and an Australian national kumite referee and kata judge. He also has a passion for music, and particularly Western opera.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Jesse PrinzJesse Prinz

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Philosophy
Email: jesse@subcortex.com

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Jesse Prinz, distinguished professor of philosophy, is a notable expert in philosophy of psychology and a strong proponent of the emerging methodology known as experimental philosophy. His books include Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis (2002); Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of the Emotions (2004); and The Emotional Construction of Morals (2007). Two books are forthcoming: Beyond Human Nature and The Conscious Brain. His edited books include Mind and Cognition (3rd ed.), with William Lycan (2008); and Handbook of Philosophy of Psychology (forthcoming). He was a visiting fellow at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, a research fellow at the School for Advanced Study at the University of London, and before coming to the Graduate Center, was John J. Rogers Distinguished Professor in the department of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Chicago.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Theodore RaphanTheodore Raphan

College: Brooklyn College
Department: Computer Science
Email: raphan@nsi.brooklyn.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 951-4193

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Theodore Raphan was a postdoctoral fellow in neurophysiology at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and was appointed assistant professor of neurology in 1979. Since coming to Brooklyn College in 1982, he has been associate professor, professor and Broeklundian Professor of Computer and Information Science. He was appointed Distinguished Professor in 1994. He directs the Institute of Neural and Intelligent Systems at Brooklyn College and does research on robotics, machine learning, molecular dynamics, database management, biomechanics, the role of the vestibular system in stabilizing gaze and locomotion, and modeling the mechanisms of learning in sensory-motor systems. He also is engaged in educational programs, developing programs to include robotics in teaching computer science and directing a STEM program for the Early College High School program. He has had continuous funding from the NIH, NASA, NSF and NY State since 1976.

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Brooklyn College Natural Sciences

Robert Reid-PharrRobert Reid-Pharr

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: English
Email: rreid-pharr@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8326

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A Presidential Professor of English and American Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Robert Fitzgerald Reid-Pharr holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as an M.A. in Afro-American Studies and a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale. Before coming to the Graduate Center he was an assistant and associate professor of English at the Johns Hopkins University. In addition, he has been the Drue Heinz Visiting Professor of English at the University of Oxford, the Carlisle and Barbara Moore Distinguished Visiting Professor of English at the University of Oregon, the Frederic Ives Carpenter Visiting Assistant Professor of English at the University of Chicago, and the Edward Said Distinguished Visiting Professor of American Studies at the American University of Beirut.His publications include Conjugal Union: The Body, The House, and The Black American. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999; Black Gay Man: Essays. New York: New York University Press, 2001; and Once You Go Black: Choice, Desire, and the Black American Intellectual. New York: New York University Press, 2007. He has also published numerous articles and reviews in, among other places, American Literature, American Literary History, Callaloo, Afterimage, Small Axe, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Women and Performance, Social Text, Transition, Studies in the Novel, The African American Review, and Radical America. His research and writing have been supported by grants from the Ford Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

David ReynoldsDavid Reynolds

College: Baruch College
Department: English
Email: rey.sn@juno.com
Office Phone: (646) 312-3942

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David S. Reynolds is Distinguished Professor of English and American Studies at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights, winner of the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award; winner of the Kansas State Book Award; finalist for the Peter Seaborg Award for Civil War Scholarship; listed among “The Outstanding Books of 2005” by the National Book Critics Circle; listed among “Top Picks” of “Notable Books of 2005” by American Library Association; and noted as “the most widely reviewed book in America in major periodicals” for the period of April 19-May 5, 2005 by Publishers’ Lunch. His other books include Walt Whitman and Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass the 150th Anniversary Edition. His earlier books include Walt Whitman’s America: A Cultural Biography, winner of the coveted Bancroft Prize and the Ambassador Book Award and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His other books include Beneath the American Renaissance: The Subversive Imagination in the Age of Emerson and Melville (winner of the prestigious Christian Gauss Award and Honorable Mention for the John Hope Franklin Prize), George Lippard, and Faith in Fiction: The Emergence of Religious Literature in America. He is the editor of George Lippard, Prophet of Protest: Writings of an American Radical and the coeditor of The Serpent in the Cup: Temperance in American Literature and of an edition of three works by the popular nineteenth-century novelist George Thompson. He is a regular contributor to the New York Times Book Review. He received a B.A. magna cum laude from Amherst College and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He is at work on a book on the politics and culture of Jacksonian America, to be published by HarperCollins. Distinguished Professor Reynolds is one of a handful of professors chosen to represent CUNY in its “Look Who’s Teaching Here” ad campaign, featured in New York’s subways, buses, posters, and newspapers. Professor Reynolds is included in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World. He was born and raised in Rhode Island and currently lives on Long Island with his wife, Suzanne Nalbantian, a professor of comparative literature at Long Island University. Their daughter, Aline Reynolds, recently graduated magna cum laude from Barnard College.

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Baruch College Arts & Humanities

Joan RichardsonJoan Richardson

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: English
Email: jrichardson@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8316

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Joan Richardson is Distinguished Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and American Studies at The Graduate Center. Author of a two-volume biography of the poet Wallace Stevens, she co-edited, with Frank Kermode, Wallace Stevens: Collected Poetry and Prose (Library of America, 1997). Her essays on Stevens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Jonathan Edwards have been published in the Wallace Stevens Journal, in Raritan, and elsewhere, and essays on Alfred North Whitehead, William James, and pragmatism have appeared in the journals Configurations and The Hopkins Review. Review essays have appeared in Bookforum and other journals. Her study A Natural History of Pragmatism: The Fact of Feeling from Jonathan Edwards to Gertrude Stein was published by Cambridge University Press in 2007, and was nominated for the 2011 Grawemeyer Award in Religion. Another volume for Cambridge, Pragmatism and American Experience will be published in June 2014. Among other current writing engagements, she is preparing for press Images, Shadows of Divine Things, the project for which she was awarded a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship. Inspired in part by Jonathan Edwards, it is a secular spiritual autobiography in hybrid, experimental form. Professor Richardson has also been the recipient of several other awards, including a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship and a Senior Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Her work reflects an abiding interest in the way that philosophy, natural history, and science intersect with literature. She is particularly preoccupied with the complex relation between language and perception.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

David RindskopfDavid Rindskopf

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Educational Psychology and Psychology
Email: drindskopf@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8287

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David Rindskopf is Distinguished Professor of Educational Psychology and Psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center, where he has taught since 1979. His research and teaching are in the area of applied statistics, measurement, and research design. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), and has served as the President of the New York Chapter of the ASA. He has also served as
President of the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology; he has served as Associate Editor of the Society’s journal, Multivariate Behavioral Research. Professor Rindskopf is currently Editor of the Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, jointly published by ASA and the American Educational Research Association.Professor Rindskopf’s research mostly involves creative applications of statistical techniques to applied problems. He is pursuing one such application along with Professor William Shadish of UC Merced, for which they have a grant from the Institute of Educational Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education: Data from some research areas come from case studies, which often provide detailed observations or measurements of individuals. Professors Rindskopf and Shadish are investigating ways of using statistical methods to analyze data from such studies; these methods try to capture the pattern of results within each individual, and then see how much similarity there is across people. If there are differences, these methods can be used to try to discover explanations for these differences.

Professor Rindskopf has also applied his knowledge to help the business community. For example, along with his colleague Professor Alan Gross he has worked with Business Week to detect attempts to “cheat” on surveys that are used to help determine the ranking of MBA programs.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Carl RiskinCarl Riskin

College: Queens College
Department: Economics
Email: carl.riskin@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-5454

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Riskin has been one of the pioneers of contemporary Chinese economic studies. His China’s Political Economy: The Quest for Development since 1949 (Oxford, 1987) was a comprehensive history of China, from a political economy perspective, since the founding of the People’s Republic. He has explored many aspects of modern China’s history, from the role of economic “surplus” in explaining China’s devolution from the world’s most advanced country in the 14th century to a relatively backward one at the time of Western penetration in the mid-19th century; to work incentives and technological dualism in the Mao era from a modern social science viewpoint; to the causes of the great famine of 1959-61.Since 1987, Riskin has been analyzing China’s changing income distribution, based upon a series of large-scale surveys carried out in China. His Inequality and Poverty in China in the Age of Globalization (Oxford, 2001), written with A.R. Khan, for the first time used correct, internationally comparable definitions of income and found rapidly rising income inequality between 1988 and 1995 and, as a result, a smaller decline in poverty than warranted by the speed of China’s economic growth. China’s Retreat from Equality (M.E. Sharpe, 2001), of which Riskin was principal editor as well as author, explored the exceptionally rich data of the 1995 survey in comprehensive detail. After the third survey round in 2002, Riskin (again with Khan) unexpectedly found that income inequality in both cities and countryside had declined after 1995, as they documented in The China Quarterly (June 2005). Since that finding he has focused on explaining it with reference to the relative contributions of market developments and government policies.

Riskin has also done a number of commissioned studies for the United Nations Development Programme. He helped prepare China’s National Report to the World Summit on Social Development in Copenhagen in March 1995 and organized at UNDP’s request an International Symposium on Social Development in Beijing in October 1994. In 1996, under UNDP auspices, he appraised China’s poverty alleviation program for the government’s Leading Group for Economic Development of Poor Areas. And he produced the first two national Human Development Reports for China, in 1997 and 1999. He has also helped UNDP in other parts of the world, including Uzbekistan, Latvia and Laos. For the Asia and Pacific Bureau of UNDP he produced a study of the UN response to the “Asian Crisis” of 1997-98. Most recently, he prepared and co-authored The Macroeconomics of Poverty Reduction: The Case of China, Beijing, UNDP China (2004); and led UNDP’s evaluation of its global program of producing national Human Development Reports (2005-06).

Riskin obtained his Ph.D. from the University of California in 1969 and has taught economics at Queens College since 1974. Among his many professional affiliations, he is a senior research scholar and adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Weatherhead East Asian Institute. He currently resides on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

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Queens College Social Sciences

Chase RobinsonChase Robinson

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History
Email: CRobinson@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-7200

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Chase F. Robinson, Distinguished Professor of History, is considered the leading expert of his generation on early Islamic history. From 2003 to 2005, he chaired Oxford University’s Faculty of Oriental Studies, having first served as a professor of Islamic history at Oxford, beginning in 1993. He was appointed provost and senior vice president of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in the fall of 2008.In addition to over thirty scholarly articles, he is the author and editor of several monographs and collected works. These include Empire and Elites after the Muslim Conquest: The Transformation of Northern Mesopotamia Cambridge, 2000); A Medieval Islamic City Reconsidered: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Samarra (Oxford, 2001); Islamic Historiography (Cambridge, 2003); and Abd al-Malik (Oxford, 2005). The Legacy of the Prophet: The Middle East and Islam, 600-1300 (Cambridge) and The Formation of Islam, Sixth to Eleventh Century (vol. 1 of the 6-volume New Cambridge History of Islam) are forthcoming in 2009.

Robinson has received grants and fellowships from the British Academy, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and the American Research Center in Egypt. A native of Newton, Massachusetts, Robinson received his bachelor’s degree from Brown University and his Ph.D. from Harvard.

As provost, Robinson will have overall responsibility for the quality and performance of the degree-granting programs. Specific responsibilities include oversight of curriculum development, degree requirements, governance, academic program reviews, institutional research, academic planning, instructional and non-instructional staffing, educational resources, and budgetary matters related to these areas. He will build upon the accomplishments of Linda Edwards, who served as the Graduate Center’s acting provost from 2005 to 2007, and Julia Wrigley, who served as acting provost in 2008. “The Graduate Center has established itself as one of the country’s leading institutions of Ph.D. education and research,” Robinson said. “I look forward to working with colleagues so as to continue their success in securing greater student support, building programs, and recruiting and retaining faculty of the highest quality.”

CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Ruthann RobsonRuthann Robson

College: CUNY School of Law
Department: Law
Email: robson@mail.law.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 340-4447

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Ruthann Robson, Professor of Law and University Distinguished Professor, teaches in the areas of constitutional law, family law, feminist legal theory, and sexuality and the law, and is faculty advisor to the New York City Law Review. She is the author of numerous works developing a lesbian legal theory, which include the books Sappho Goes to Law School and Lesbian (Out)Law: Survival Under the Rule of Law, and many articles in such journals as New York Law School Journal of Human Rights, Albany Law Review, Women’s Rights Law Reporter, Hastings Law Journal, Australian Feminist Law Journal, Yearbook of New Zealand Jurisprudence, as well as feminist journals such as Signs, Hypatia, and Women’s Studies Quarterly. The New York City Law Review has published a symposium on her work in volume 8, issue 2.Professor Robson received her J.D. from Stetson University College of Law and an LL.M. from the University of California at Berkeley (Boalt Hall), clerked for a federal district court judge and a federal judge on the Eleventh Court of Appeals, and practiced law with Florida Legal Services. She has given many presentations on women and sexuality and the law in the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. A frequent contributor to Out Magazine, she has won prizes for her creative work, including novels, short story collections, poetry, and creative nonfiction.

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CUNY School of Law Social Sciences

Jay RosenJay Rosen

College: College of Staten Island
Department: Mathematics
Email: jrosen30@optimum.net
Office Phone: (718) 982-3610

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Jay Rosen received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Princeton University and a B.A. in Mathematics from Harvard University. Before coming to the College of Staten Island and the CUNY Graduate Center, he taught at the University of Massachusetts and was a Research Associate at Rockefeller University.In addition to his teaching activities at CUNY, he has held a number of visiting positions and has given special lectures around the world. He is the author of numerous publications including the book Markov Processes, Gaussian Processes, and Local Times.

Professor Rosen is co-organizer of the probability group and the weekly Probability Seminar at the CUNY Graduate Center, and co-organizer of the Northeast Probability Seminar, an annual meeting funded by the NSF.

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College of Staten Island Natural Sciences

Morris RossabiMorris Rossabi

College: Queens College
Department: History
Email: morris.rossabi@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-5382

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Morris Rossabi was born in in the multi-ethnic environment of Alexandria, Egypt and was raised to speak Arabic, English, and French. Migrating to the U.S. as a boy, he became fluent i German before studying for a Ph.D. in East and Central Asian History at Columbia University. During graduate school, he learned Chinese and Japanese and several Central Asian languages. Fluency in those languages permitted him to conduct research for his first two books China and Inner Asia (Thames and Hudson, 1975) and China among Equals (University of California Press, 1983), which were major challenges to the conventional wisdom about Chinese foreign relations. He showed that China was well informed about foreign lands, was not isolationist, and often treated foreigners as equals–all contrary to the prevailing interpretations.He then pioneered the study of Central and Inner Asia, focusing attention on these neglected regions. His articles and books on the Muslims and Manchus of China, on relations between China and Central Asia, and on cultural and economic interchanges along the Silk Roads, among other subjects, were well received by scholars. Culmination of these studies was his book Khubilai Khan (University of California Press, 1988), which was chosen as the Main Selection for May of 1988 by the History Book Club and was translated into six foreign languages. The New Republic stated that this first study of one of the most famous figures in world history “was much more than a biography” and “was a comprehensive treatment of the cultural and political dimensions of the thirteenth century in both China and Central Asia.” Professor Jonathan Spence of Yale University wrote of Rossabi’s book on the first attested man from China to travel to Europe (Voyager from Xanadu; Kodansha, 1992): “Rossabi’s erudite commentary and fine evocation of context has given the adventure a wider scope.” Prompted by these reviews, the Editor of the authoritative, multi-volume Cambridge History of China honored Rossabi by commissioning him to write the chapters on China and Inner Asia from the mid-13th century to 1800.

As China and Inner Asia became easier to visit in the 1980s, Rossabi, who had studied social and cultural relations among China, Central Asia, and the Middle East, traveled to these regions, resulting in a series of major exhibitions. He wrote essays for three catalogs of Chinese and Mongolian art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Asian Art Museum of San Francisco among others, and the College Art Association awarded its prize for best catalog of the year 2002 to “The Legacy of Genghis Khan.” At the same time, his travels stimulated involvement in promoting economic and political democracy in the regions he had studied. He assisted the Open Society Institute to found an office in Mongolia in 1996 and served on the Advisory Board of its Project for Central Eurasia from 1996 to 1999. Later he became Chair of the Arts and Culture Board, which fostered artistic renewal and freedom in Central Asia, Mongolia, the Caucasus, Afghanistan, and the Middle East. Such involvement resulted in two scholarly books: Modern Mongolia: From Khans to Commissars to Capitalists ( University of California Press, 2005), which received the Philio Lilienthal imprint, and (with Mary Rossabi) Bounty from the Sheep (White Horse Press, 2000).

His scholarly studies aside, Rossabi has been an ardent advocate for public education about Asia. He has appeared on television and radio, given speeches at the Council on Foreign Relations, universities, and libraries throughout the U.S., Europe, and Asia, written articles for the mass media, and lectured at museums and public interest groups. He has also collaborated with the Asia Society, China Institute, Columbia University, and the American Museum of Natural History to train secondary school teachers and to produce curricular materials. The Association for Asian Studies, the leading organization in this field, bestowed the Franklin Buchanan Award on “From Silk to Oil,” one of these curricular materials.

In sum, Rossabi has devoted himself to scholarly research, teaching, and public service work on Asia.

(Foster Henry)

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Queens College Social Sciences

Myriam SarachikMyriam Sarachik

College: The City College of New York
Department: Physics
Email: sarachik@sci.ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-5618/5620

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Born in Antwerp, Belgium Myriam Sarachik attended primary school in Antwerp and Havana, Cuba and high school at the Bronx High School of Science in New York. She earned a B. A. cum laude from Barnard College in 1954, majoring in physics. After working for a year at the IBM Watson Laboratories at Columbia University she returned to graduate school, receiving a M.S. in 1957 and a Ph.D. in 1960 from Columbia University.
Following a year as a research associate at IBM Watson Laboratories and a teacher at CCNY in the evening, she became a Member of the Technical Staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories at Murray Hill, New Jersey. In September 1964 she was appointed assistant professor at the CCNY. She was promoted to associate professor in 1967, to the rank of professor in 1971, and Distinguished Professor in 1995. She served as the Executive Officer of the University wide CUNY Ph. D. Program in Physics from 1975 to 1978.

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The City College of New York Natural Sciences

David SavranDavid Savran

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Theatre and English
Email: dsavran@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8874

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David Savran is a Distinguished Professor at the Graduate Center. He holds a Ph.D. in Theatre Arts from Cornell University. Major publications include: Breaking the Rules: The Wooster Group (1988); In Their Own Words: Contemporary American Playwrights (1988); Communists, Cowboys and Queers: The Politics of Masculinity in the Work of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams (1992); Taking it Like a Man: White Masculinity, Masochism, and Contemporary American Culture (1998); The Playwright’s Voice: American Dramatists on Memory, Writing, and the Politics of Culture (1999); and A Queer Sort of Materialism: Recontextualizing American Theatre (2003). He is the editor of the Journal of American Drama and Theatre and has served as the Vice President of the American Society for Theatre Research. He was a judge for the Village Voice Obie Awards for two years and has been on the nominating committee for the Lucille Lortel Awards since 2005. His current research involves an investigation of jazz and theatrical modernism in the US during the 1920s.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Mitchell SchafflerMitchell Schaffler

College: The City College of New York
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Email: mschaffler@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-5070

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Mitchell B. Schaffler is the CUNY and Wallace H. Coulter Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the City College of New York, and Director of the New York Center for Biomedical Engineering (NYCBE), the research consortium among CCNY and the major New York City teaching hospitals and medical schools. Before coming to City College, he was Professor of Orthopaedics, Anatomy and CellBiology and Director of Orthopaedic Research at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He is an authority on skeletal biomechanics, bone material properties (i.e., bone quality) in aging and disease, osteoporosis and bone cell mechanobiology. His research pioneered the current understandings of how wear and tear processes occur in bone from normal usage, how bone can self-repair wear and tear damage at the cellular and microscope level to prevent fracture, and how failures of that cellular repair process in aging and disease cause bone to become fragile and fracture.He received his B.S. in Biological Sciences from Stony Brook University, his Ph.D. studies in Anatomy and Orthopaedics from West Virginia University and did post-doctoral studies at the U.S. Department of Energy Radiobiology Laboratory at the University of Utah. Prior to joining the faculty at City College, he served on the faculties of the University of California, San Diego, the University of Michigan and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He has authored more than 250 full-length research articles, reviews, symposia papers and book chapters on skeletal biomechanics and biology. He has served on advisory panels for the National Institutes of Health, NASA, the Orthopedic Research and Educational Foundation and the Arthritis Foundation. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Association of Anatomists.

The City College of New York Natural Sciences

Grace SchulmanGrace Schulman

College: Baruch College
Department: English
Email: Grace_Schulman@baruch.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 312-3941

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She is author of Marianne Moore: The Poetry of Engagement; editor of Ezra Pound, translator from the Hebrew of T. Carmi’s At the Stone of Losses; and co-translator from the Spanish of Pablo Antonio Cuadra’s Songs of Cifar. She is Poetry Editor of the Nation, and former director of the Poetry Center, 92nd Street Y. Schulman received her Ph.D. from New York University, and is Distinguished Professor of English at Baruch College, CUNY. She has taught poetry writing at Princeton, Columbia, Wesleyan, Bennington, and Warren Wilson. Her poems have been published in the New Yorker, the New Republic, Paris Review, Antaeus, Grand Street, the Yale Review, the Hudson Review, and the Kenyon Review, among other journals. Her essays and translations have appeared widely. She lives in New York with her husband, a scientist, Dr. Jerome L. Schulman.

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Baruch College Arts & Humanities

Sarah SchulmanSarah Schulman

College: College of Staten Island
Department: English
Email: Sarah.Schulman@csi.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 982-3685

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Sarah Schulman is the author of the novels The Mere Future (2009), The Child (2007), Shimmer (1998), Rat Bohemia (1995), Empathy (1992), People in Trouble (1990), After Delores (1988), Girls, Visions and Everything (1986), and The Sophie Horowitz Story (1984); the nonfiction books The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination (2011), Ties That Bind: Familial Homophobia and Its Consequences (2009), Stagestruck: Theater, AIDS and the Marketing of Gay America (1998), My American History: Lesbian/Gay Life During the Reagan/Bush Years (1994); the plays Carson McCullers (Playwrights Horizons, 2002), Manic Flight Reaction (Playwrights Horizons, 2005), Enemies, A Love Story (adapted from IJ Singer, Wilma Theater, 2007); and the films The Owls (2010, with Cheryl Dunye), Mommy Is Coming (2011, with Cheryl Dunye), and Lonely Hunter: The Love of Carson McCullers (2012).Her awards and honors include a Guggenheim (playwrighting), a Fullbright (Judaic Studies), three NY Foundation for the Arts fellowships (Fiction, Playwriting, Fiction), an American Library Association Stonewall Award (Fiction, Nonfiction), a Revson Fellowship for the Future of New York City at Columbia University, the Kessler Prize for Sustained Contribution to LGBT Studies, a fellowship at the New York Center for the Humanities at New York University, and residencies at Yaddo and McDowell. She is a member of the Advisory Collective of the Carr Center for Human Rights and Social Movements at The Harvard Kennedy School.

A participant citizen, Sarah has been involved in a number of foundational movements for social change, including Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse, AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, and The Lesbian Avengers. Sarah is co-founder with Jim Hubbard of the MIX LGBT Film and Video Festival, now in its 24th year and The ACT UP Oral History Project. In 2010 she organized a US tour of leaders of the Palestinian LGBT Movement.

Current work in progress includes a novel The Healing, inspired by Balzac’s Cousin Bette; a nonfiction book Solidarity Visit: Israel/ Palestine and the Queer International ; a film about Cheddi and Janet Jagen, the democratically elected Communist leaders of Guyana; a number of plays; and Adventures in the 419, a collaboration with Cheryl Dunye about African immigrants in Europe.

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College of Staten Island Arts & Humanities

Robert SchwartzRobert Schwartz

College: Baruch College
Department: Business
Email: Robert_Schwartz@baruch.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 312-3467

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Robert A. Schwartz is Marvin M. Speiser Professor of Finance and University Distinguished Professor in the Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, CUNY. Before joining the Baruch faculty in 1997, he was Professor of Finance and Economics and Yamaichi Faculty Fellow at New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business, where he had been a member of the faculty since 1965. Professor Schwartz received his Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University. His research is in the area of financial economics, with a primary focus on the structure of securities markets. He has published over 50 refereed journal articles and fifteen books, including The Equity Trader Course (co-authored with Reto Francioni and Bruce Weber) Wiley & Sons, 2006, Equity Markets in Action: The Fundamentals of Liquidity, Market Structure and Trading (co-authored with Reto Francioni) Wiley & Sons, 2004, and Reshaping the Equity Markets: A Guide for the 1990s, Harper Business, 1991 (reissued by Business One Irwin, 1993). He has served as a consultant to various market centers including the New York Stock Exchange, the American Stock Exchange, Nasdaq, the London Stock Exchange, Instinet, the Arizona Stock Exchange, Deutsche Börse, and the Bolsa Mexicana. From April 1983 to April 1988, he was an associate editor of The Journal of Finance, and he is currently an associate editor of the Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, the Review of Pacific Basin Financial Markets and Policies, and The Journal of Entrepreneurial
Finance & Business Ventures, and is a member of the advisory boards of International Finance and The Journal of Trading. In December 1995, Professor Schwartz was named the first chairman of Nasdaq’s Economic Advisory Board, and he served on the EAB until Spring 1999. He is developer, with Bruce Weber, of the trading and market structure simulation, TraderEx.

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Baruch College Social Sciences

Lia SchwartzLia Schwartz

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages and Comparative Literature
Email: lschwartz@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8411

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Lía Schwartz, originally from Argentina, has studied at the University of Buenos Aires, the University of Mainz, Germany, and the University of Illinois, where she earned her Ph.D. She has taught at Fordham University, New York University, Princeton University, and Queens College, CUNY, and came to The Graduate Center from Dartmouth, where she held an endowed chair in Spanish and was chair of the Spanish and Portuguese department. A celebrated scholar in the field of Renaissance and baroque Spanish literature, Schwartz has special expertise in the works of Francisco de Quevedo (1580-1645) and other Renaissance authors, the subjects of her widely published books and articles. She has been active in the Modern Language Association and other professional organizations and is now chair of the Cultural Affairs Committee of the Queen Sophia Spanish Institute in New York. Professor Schwartz is also an advisory board member of numerous significant journals in her field, is a board member of the International Association of Golden Age Studies, and was secretary general (1992-98) and president (1998-2001) of the International Association of Hispanists.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

S. Prakash SethiS. Prakash Sethi

College: Baruch College
Department: Business
Email: Prakash_Sethi@baruch.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (646) 312-2230

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Dr. Sethi is University Distinguished Professor of Management at the Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, The City University of New York. He is currently visiting Yale University as Forrest Mars, Sr. Professor of Ethics, Politics and Economics. He holds a Masters degree in Economics from Delhi University, India, and MBA and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University, New York.Dr. Sethi has extensive experience in monitoring sweatshop like working conditions in factories in China and other parts of Asia including Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Bangladesh and India.
Dr. Sethi enjoys international recognition as a pre-eminent researcher and scholar in the areas of corporate social responsibility and accountability, ethical norms of business conduct, sustainable development, human rights, environmental protection, and international codes of conduct. He has done pioneering work in creating and implementing international corporate codes of conduct and global supply-chain management.

In addition to his academic responsibilities, Dr. Sethi is the founder and President of Sethi International Center for Corporate Accountability Inc., (SICCA). SICCA is an independent non-profit think tank, which undertakes cutting-edge research and public policy advocacy in the area of enhanced corporate accountability through voluntary corporate codes of conduct in the national and international arena. Under his direction, SICCA has conducted independent external audits of major multinational corporations for compliance verification with the companies’ international codes of conduct in a number of countries around the world.
In 2008, Dr. Sethi was awarded the Reputation Institute Award for Inspiring and Innovative Contribution to Scholarship and Practice. He was also the recipient of the “Beyond the Grey Pinstripes 2003 Faculty Pioneer Award for External Impact” given by The Aspen Institute’s Business and Society Program and World Resources Institute. More recently, his work was profiled in a lengthy article in the New York Times Sunday Magazine.

He has published 24 books and over 135 articles in professional and scholarly journals. His writings have also appeared in major national and international news media including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Business Week. His two most recent books on this subject are: Group Purchasing Organizations: An Undisclosed Scandal in the U.S. Healthcare Industry (New York: Palgrave McMillan, 2009), and Setting Global Standards: Guidelines for Creating Codes of Conduct in Multinational Corporations (New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2003).

Baruch College Social Sciences

Thomas SleighThomas Sleigh

College: Hunter College
Department: English
Email: tomsleigh@earthlink.net
Office Phone: (212) 772-5176

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Tom Sleigh’s most recent book of poetry, Space Walk (Houghton Mifflin, 2007), won the 2008 Kingsley Tufts Award. His book of essays, Interview with a Ghost, was published by Graywolf Press in 2006. He has also published After One, Waking, The Chain, The Dreamhouse, Far Side of the Earth, Bula Matari/Smasher of Rocks, and a translation of Euripides’ Herakles. He has won the Shelley Prize from the PSA, and grants from the Lila Wallace Fund, American Academy of Arts and Letters, American Academy in Berlin, the Guggenheim and NEA. His new book, Army Cats, is forthcoming in spring, 2011, from Graywolf Press. He teaches in the MFA Program at Hunter College.

Hunter College Arts & Humanities

Paul Julian SmithPaul Julian Smith

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Spanish
Email: psmith@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8393

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Paul Julian Smith is Distinguished Professor of Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages. He is a renowned specialist in the visual culture of Spain and Latin America, although he began his research in the field of Spanish Golden Age literature. After taking his BA (1980) and PhD (1984) in Cambridge, his first academic post was at Queen Mary College, University of London. He then became the Professor of Spanish (1933) in the University of Cambridge from 1991 to 2010, the fifth scholar to occupy this sole established Chair. He has been invited as Visiting Professor in 10 universities including University of California Berkeley, New York University, Lund (Sweden), Stanford, and the Universidad Carlos III, Madrid. He is the author of 15 books, some of which are translated into Spanish and Chinese, including: Writing in the Margin: Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1988), Laws of Desire: Questions of Homosexuality in Spanish Writing and Film, 1960-90 (Oxford: Oxford UP, 1992), The Theatre of García Lorca: Text, Performance, Psychoanalysis (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998); The Moderns: Time, Space, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Spanish Culture (Oxford: Oxford UP, 2000); Contemporary Spanish Culture: TV, Fashion, Art, and Film (Oxford: Polity, 2003); Amores Perros (London: BFI, 2003), Spanish Visual Culture: Cinema, Television, Internet (Manchester: Manchester UP, 2006), Television in Spain: From Franco to Almodóvar (London: Boydell and Brewer, 2006), and Spanish Screen Fiction: Between Cinema and Television (Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 2009). He has written over sixty academic articles and given over one hundred invited lectures and conference papers. He is also a frequent contributor to Sight and Sound, the monthly magazine of the British Film Institute and writes a regular column for Film Quarterly, published by University of California Press. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2008 and was invited to be on the Jury for Mexican Feature Films at the Morelia International Film Festival in 2009. His film reviews can be read here: http://sites.google.com/site/pauljuliansmithfilmreviews/Home

CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Michael SorkinMichael Sorkin

College: The City College of New York
Department: Architecture
Email: msorkin@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-7118

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Michael Sorkin is the principal of the Michael Sorkin Studio in New York City, a design practice devoted to both practical and theoretical projects at all scales with a special interest in the city and in green architecture. Recent projects include planning and design for a highly sustainable 5000-unit community in Penang, Malaysia, master planning for the Zha Bei district in Shanghai, the design of a town of 40,000 on the Black Sea in Turkey, planning for a Palestinian capital in East Jerusalem, campus planning at the University of Chicago, studies of the Manhattan and Brooklyn waterfronts, housing design in Far Rockaway, Vienna, and Miami, a resort in the desert of Abu Dhabi, a park in Queens, New York, a group of houses in Coorg, India, and a very low-cost housing prototype for rural Alabama. The Sorkin Studio has been the recipient of numerous awards from, among others, Progressive Architecture, ID, and the AIA. Sorkin is also founding President of Terreform, a non-profit organization dedicated to research and intervention in issues of urban morphology, sustainability, equity, and community planning. Currently funded research includes a project to examine the limits of self-sufficiency within New York City and a study of sustainable transport systems. In addition, Sorkin is President of the Institute for Urban Design, New York-based educational and advocacy organization.Michael Sorkin is Distinguished Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Graduate Urban Design Program at the City College of New York where he has taught since 2000. From 1993 to 2000 he was Professor of Urbanism and Director of the Institute of Urbanism at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Previously, Sorkin has been professor at numerous schools of architecture including the Architectural Association, the Aarhus School of Architecture, Cooper Union (for ten years), Carleton, Columbia, Yale (holding both Davenport and Bishop Chairs), Harvard, Cornell (Gensler Chair), Nebraska (Hyde Chair), Illinois, Pennsylvania, Texas, Michigan (Saarinen Chair) and Minnesota (Gilbert Chair). Dedicated to urbanism as both an artistic practice and a medium for social amelioration, Sorkin has conducted studios in such stressed environments as Jerusalem, Nicosia, Johannesburg, Havana, Cairo, Kumasi, Hanoi, Nueva Loja (Ecuador) and Wuhan (China). In 2005 -2006, he directed studio projects for the post-Katrina reconstruction of Biloxi and New Orleans at both CCNY and the University of Michigan.

Sorkin lectures around the world, is the author of several hundred articles in a wide range of both professional and general publications, and is currently contributing editor at Architectural Record for which he writes a regular column. For ten years, he was the architecture critic of The Village Voice. His books include Variations on A Theme Park, Exquisite Corpse, Local Code, Giving Ground (edited with Joan Copjec), Wiggle (a monograph of the studio’s work), Some Assembly Required, Other Plans, The Next Jerusalem, After The Trade Center (edited with Sharon Zukin), Starting From Zero, Analyzing Ambasz, Against the Wall and Indefensible Space. Forthcoming are Twenty Minutes in Manhattan, Eutopia, All Over the Map, and Project New Orleans.

Sorkin also serves as an international consultant on urban and architectural design and participates in numerous juries, seminars, and symposia. Most recently, this activity has included chairing a jury to choose two very large urban planning and architectural projects for the Municipality of Istanbul, a similar jury in Almaty, Kazakhstan, a jury to choose a design for the headquarters of Genzyme, a campus planning consultancy to the University of Cincinnati, expert assessment for the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, as well as juries for design magazines, architectural schools, and professional organizations. Sorkin was founding co-chair of the Chrysler Design Award and currently serves as a member of the boards of directors or advisors of a number of civic and academic bodies, including the Architectural League, Archeworks, the London Consortium, and several institutes at CUNY.

Michael Sorkin was born in Washington, D.C. and received his architectural training at Harvard and MIT. He also holds degrees from the University of Chicago and Columbia.

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The City College of New York Arts & Humanities

Domna StantonDomna Stanton

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: French
Email: dstanton112@aol.com
Office Phone: (212) 817-8386

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Domna Stanton is a renowned scholar of seventeenth-century and early-modern French studies with an influential feminist perspective. Her first book, The Aristocrat as Art: A Study of the Honnête Homme and the Dandy in 17th- and 19th-Century French Literature, is considered a classic. Her most recent books are Women Writ, Women Writing: Gendered Discourse and Differences in Seventeenth-Century France and The Nation as Its Others. Her edited volumes include The Defiant Muse: French Feminist Poems from the 12th to the 20th Centuries; The Female Autograph; Discourses of Sexuality from Aristotle to AIDS; and Feminisms in the Academy. Among her extensive professional accomplishments, Professor Stanton was the first female editor of PMLA, the journal of the Modern Language Association; she assumes the presidency of the MLA in 2005. Previously the Elizabeth M. Douvan Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan, she received her Ph.D. from Columbia University. Professor Stanton is also now teaching and writing on international human rights and is an active member of the board of Human Rights Watch.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Ruth StarkRuth Stark

College: The City College of New York – CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Chemistry
Email: rstark@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-8916

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Professor Stark received her A.B. degree at Cornell University in upstate New York and obtained her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry under the guidance of Robert and Regitze Vold at the University of California, San Diego in 1977. Subsequently, she joined the group of Dr. Robert Griffin at MIT’s National Magnet Lab as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow for two years. In 1979, she was appointed Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Amherst College and spent a sabbatical year in Professor Mary Roberts’ lab at MIT. She moved to CUNY College of Staten Island in 1985 as Associate Professor of Chemistry, gaining the designation of CUNY Distinguished Professor in 2006. Professor Stark also directs the CUNY Institute for Macromolecular Assemblies, which relocated to The City College of New York in September, 2007.

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The City College of New York – CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Stephen SteinbergStephen Steinberg

College: Queens College
Department: Urban Studies
Email: ssteinberg1@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 997-5130

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A revised biography of Professor Steinberg will be published soon. Stephen Steinberg, a sociologist, is an internationally renowned authority on race and ethnicity in the United States. His most recent book is Race Relations: A Critique (Stanford University Press, September 2007). His last book, Turning Back: The Retreat from Racial Justice in American Thought and Policy (Beacon Press,
1995), was included in Choice Magazine’s 1996 list of Outstanding Academic Books, and received the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship. His previous work, The Ethnic Myth, is widely recognized as one of the leading critical interpretations of race, ethnicity, and class in America. Other books include The Academic Melting Pot and The Tenacity of Prejudice.Steinberg teaches courses on Racial and Ethnic Groups in Urban America and Race, Ethnicity, and Public Policy. He also teaches the required graduate and undergraduate course on Urban Research Methods, an innovative course that emphasizes the development of critical skills in reading and interpreting social science research… His interest in improving the quality of student research and writing is reflected in a book that he co-authored with Sharon Friedman, Writing and Thinking in the Social Sciences (Prentice-Hall, 1989).

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Queens College Social Sciences

Joseph StrausJoseph Straus

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Music
Email: jstraus@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8602

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Joseph Straus is a music theorist specializing in music of the twentieth century, with research interests that include set theory, voice-leading in post-tonal music, the music of Stravinsky, and the music Ruth Crawford Seeger. His book, Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory, is a standard college textbook on this topic. His book Remaking the Past received the Wallace Berry award from the Society for Music Theory (SMT); Prof. Straus was the President of the SMT from 1997-99.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Dennis SullivanDennis Sullivan

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Mathematics
Email: dsullivan@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8578

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An internationally renowned theoretical mathematician, Sullivan specializes in topology, geometry, and dynamical systems. He was named Albert Einstein Chair in Science in 1981, at the time in cooperation with Queens College. During the 1980s the resources of the chair allowed the founding of a regular seminar in geometry and chaos theory that brought first-rank international scholars to CUNY and New York City.Subsequently, the seminar has been supported by The Graduate Center, pursuing the connections between topology and the mathematical models of nature provided by quantum field theory and fluid mechanics. Along with the title of Albert Einstein Chair, Sullivan is a distinguished professor of mathematics at The Graduate Center. Prior to coming to CUNY he held positions at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Berkeley, and Princeton University, and he had a long research association (1973-1996) with the Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifique outside Paris. Currently, he also serves on the mathematics faculty at SUNY Stony Brook. He received his B.A.from Rice University and a Ph.D. from Princeton.

Sullivan’s work has been acknowledged by some of his field’s most prestigious prizes and distinctions, among them: the Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry from the American Mathematical Society (1971), the Elie Cartan Prix en Geometrie from the French Academy of Sciences (1981), the King Faisal International Prize in Science (1993), and a 1997 New York City Mayor’s Award for Excellence in Science and Technology. In 1991, he was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the New York Academy of Sciences, and is a former vice president of the American Mathematical Society.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Lucien SzpiroLucien Szpiro

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Mathematics
Email: lszpiro@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8542

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Lucien Szpiro came to The Graduate Center from the National Center of Scientific Research at the University of Paris (Universite de Paris-Sud), where he earned his Ph.D. and where he had served as Directeur de Recherches de Classe Exceptionelle (Distinguished Professor) since 1991. Ranked among the world’s leading mathematicians specializing in the fields of commutative algebra, Diophantine geometry, and arithmetic algebraic geometry, he is also a major force in such significant developments as Faltings’s solution of the Mordell conjecture. He introduced, developed, and applied Arakelov’s theory as a refined tool of modern Diophantine geometry. His conjecture about the discriminant of elliptic curves is one of the most striking problems in number theory. He has held prestigious visiting positions in the United States, Japan, India, Germany, and Holland. Since coming to The Graduate Center, Professor Szpiro has started new research in algebraic dynamics and has established with Peter Sarnak and Dorian Goldfeld the successful New York Joint Number Theory Seminar, which rotates among New York University, Columbia, and The Graduate Center.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Anthony TamburriAnthony Tamburri

College: Queens College
Department: John D. Calandra Italian American Institute; Department of European Languages and Literatures
Email: anthony.tamburri@qc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 642-2005

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Anthony Julian Tamburri is Distinguished Professor of European Languages and Literatures and Dean of the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute (Queens College, The City University of New York). His research interests lie in literature, cinema, semiotics, interpretation theory, and cultural studies. He has divided his intellectual work evenly between Italian and Italian/American studies, authoring fourteen books and one hundred essays circa on both subject areas in English and Italian. He is also the editor of more than thirty volumes and special issues of journals. His more recent publications include: authored volumes: Re-reading Italian Americana: Specificities and Generalities on Literature and Criticism (2014); Re-viewing Italian Americana: Generalities and Specificities on Cinema (2011); Una semiotica dell’etnicità: nuove segnalature per la scrittura italiano/americana (2010); and Narrare altrove: diverse segnalature letterarie (2007); co-edited volumes: Europe, Italy and the Mediterranean (2014); Italoamericana: The Literature of the Great Migration, 1880-1943, edited by Francesco Durante in Italian (2014); The Cultures of Italian Migration: Diverse Trajectories and Discrete Perspectives. (2011); Mediated Ethnicity: New Italian-American Cinema. (2010); and the best-selling anthology, From The Margin: Writings in Italian Americana (1991; 2000 2nd). He is also a co-founder of Bordighera Press, publisher of Voices in Italian Americana, Italiana, and three book series’, VIA Folios, Crossings, and Saggistica, as well as the Bordighera Poetry Prize.Tamburri has been the recipient of various, academic and scholarly awards and grants over the years. Southern Connecticut State University named him its Distinguished Alumnus for the year 2000, where he earned a B.S. in Italian and Secondary Education, and the first to earn honors in student teaching of Italian. In 2010, he received a series of awards that included ILICA’s “Frank Stella Person of the Year”, and, conferred motu proprio, the honor of Cavaliere dell’Ordine al Merito della Repubblica Italiana. In 2012 he received The Lehman-LaGuardia Award for Civic Achievement from the Commission for Social Justice Order Sons of Italy (New York State) in America and B’nai B’rith International (Metro-North Region); and he was nominated to and accepted into the Order of Merit of Savoy as Cavaliere.
Tamburri is a member of numerous organizations for which he has also held administrative positions and national office. He has been a member of the MLA’s Executive Committee for the Division on Modern Italian Literature, and co-founder of the Discussion Group on Italian/American Literature. He was president of the Italian American Studies Association from 2003-2007, and vice-president of the American Association of Teachers of Italian for 2006-2007, and served as president for 2008-2009.

Tamburri’s degrees are from Southern Connecticut State University (B.S., Italian & Spanish), Middlebury College (M.A., Italian), University of California, Berkeley (Ph.D., Italian and Spanish). In addition to teaching at Smith, Middlebury, and Auburn, he spent thirteen years at Purdue University, before moving to Florida Atlantic where, from 2000 to 2006, he served as Chair of Languages and Linguistics and subsequently Associate Dean for Research, Graduate, and Interdisciplinary Studies, as well as director of the Ph.D. in Comparative Studies and its Program for the Public Intellectual.
Tamburri has founded and directed summer programs in Italy and also held positions for the University of Pennsylvania and Middlebury College’s Scuola Estiva Italiana. He was also the first Esposito Visiting Faculty Fellow at University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth.

Tamburri is also executive producer of the TV program Italics (TW 75, RCN 77), in collaboration with CUNY TV, and a member of the founding directors of the Italian American Digital Project, which produces the Internet portal i-Italy.org, the magazine i-Italy, and i-ItalyTV.

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Queens College Arts & Humanities

John TarbellJohn Tarbell

College: The City College of New York
Department: Biomedical Engineering
Email: jtarbell@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-6841

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John M. Tarbell is currently the CUNY and Wallace Coulter Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the City College of New York, and Chair of the biomedical engineering department. Before coming to City College in 2003, he was Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Bioengineering at Penn State University. He has been active nationally in the affairs of several engineering societies and is a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (past President), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (past recipient of the Lissner Award for outstanding research from the Bioengineering Division), and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He is particularly interested in cardiovascular engineering with emphasis on the role of mechanical forces in vascular remodeling and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis that underlies heart attacks and strokes. He has published widely on these topics (more than 175 refereed journal articles) with long support from the National Institutes of Health (continuous funding for more than 25 years) and other agencies.He received his B.S. from Rutgers University and M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Delaware, all in Chemical Engineering.

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The City College of New York Natural Sciences

Jeanne TheoharisJeanne Theoharis

College: Brooklyn College
Department: Political Science
Email: JTheoharis@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 951-5306

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Jeanne Theoharis received her A.B. in Afro-American Studies from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in American Culture from the University of Michigan. She is the author or co-author of seven books and dozens of articles on the Black freedom struggle in 20th century America and the contemporary politics of race and inequality in schools, social policy, and the justice system. Her biography, The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks, has garnered widespread acclaim and numerous awards. Debuting on The New York Times bestseller list, the book won a 2014 NAACP Image Award for Biography/Autobiography and the Letitia Woods Brown Award from the Association of Black Women Historians. Her other books include the widely-cited Freedom North: Black Freedom Struggles Outside of the South, 1940-1980, and Groundwork: Local Black Freedom Movements in America with Komozi Woodard; Want to Start A Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle with Dayo Gore and Komozi Woodard; Not Working: Latina Immigrants, Low Wage Jobs and the Failure of Welfare Reform with Alejandra Marchevsky and Our Schools Suck: Students Talk Back to a Segregated Nation about the Failures of Urban Education with Gaston Alonso, Noel Anderson, and Celina Su. She has received grants from the NEH, the AAUW, and the Rockefeller Foundation. She co-curates a monthly public education series at the Schomburg Center for Research on Black Culture of the NYPL titled “Conversations in Black Freedom Studies.” Co-founder of Educators for Civil Liberties, she has written extensively on civil and human rights issues in the federal system post-9/11. Her work has appeared in The Nation, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Slate, The Root, the Washington Post, and The Progressive.

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Brooklyn College Social Sciences

Virginia ValianVirginia Valian

College: Hunter College
Department: Psychology
Email: little.linguist@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-5557

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Virginia Valian is a faculty member of the Ph.D. Programs in Psychology and Linguistics and has been a psychology professor at Hunter College since 1987. Valian’s landmark book Why So Slow? The Advancement of Women (MIT Press, 1998) uses the concepts of gender schemas and the accumulation of advantage to explain why so few women from scientists to choreographers are at the top of their professions. Valian is co-director of Hunter’s Gender Equity Project, a National Science Foundation-sponsored initiative to solve gender equity problems faced by women in science. Valian is also internationally recognized for her innovative experimental and cross-linguistic research on children’s acquisition of syntax. Her next book, Input and Innateness: Controversies in Language Acquisition, was published by MIT Press.(Photo credited to: Frank Fournier)

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Hunter College Social Sciences

Megan VaughanMegan Vaughan

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History
Email: mvaughan@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8432

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Megan Vaughan is a historian of Africa and of colonialism. Her first book, The Story of an African Famine: Gender and Famine in Twentieth-Century Malawi (C.U.P. 1987) drew on extensive oral historical research in Malawi. In 1991 she published Curing Their Ills: Colonial Power and African Illness (Polity and Stanford, 1991), an examination of colonial medical discourse and a critical discussion of the application of Foucault’s theories to colonial contexts. With the social anthropologist, Henrietta Moore, she carried our research on gender, rural livelihoods and nutrition in Northern Zambia which resulted in the publication of Cutting Down Trees: Gender, Nutrition and Agricultural Change in Northern Zambia (James Curry and Heinemann, 1987), which won the Herskovits Prize. Her 2005 book, Creating the Creole Island: Slavery in Eighteenth Century Mauritius (Duke University Press) is an examination of the creation of a slave society and the dynamics of race and ethnicity in one colonial context. It won the Society for French Colonial History award. She is currently completing a book with Walima Kalusa on death, belief and politics in Central Africa. She is a Fellow of the British Academy, past President of the African Studies Association of the U.K., and recipient of grants and fellowships from the Leverhulme Trust, the British Academy, and the Arts and Humanities Council of the U.K. Prior to her appointment as distinguished professor of history at the CUNY Graduate Center in 2013, she taught at the Universities of Malawi, Oxford and Cambridge. She serves on the editorial boards of the American Historical Review and Past and Present.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Katherine VerderyKatherine Verdery

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Anthropology
Email: kverdery@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8015

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Katherine Verdery is Julien J. Studley Faculty Scholar and Distinguished Professor of Anthropology. Since 1973 she has conducted field research in Romania, initially emphasizing the political economy of social inequality, ethnic relations, and nationalism. With the changes of 1989, her work has shifted to problems of the transformation of socialist systems, specifically changing property relations in agriculture. From 1993 to 2000 she did fieldwork on this theme in a Transylvanian community; the resulting book, The Vanishing Hectare: Property and Value in Postsocialist Transylvania, was published by Cornell University Press (2003). She is now engaged in a large collaborative project with Gail Kligman (UCLA) and a number of Romanian scholars on the opposite process, the formation of collective and state farms in Romania during the 1950s. Her teaching interests include contemporary and socialist Eastern Europe, the anthropology of property, and time and space. Future projects will probably take off from her interest in land restitution into exploring other property issues, such as cultural property, rights in bio-information, cyberspatial properties, and other forms of appropriation based in new technologies. Additionally, she hopes to write a synthesis of recent anthropological work on the “transition” in Eastern Europe.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Paul WachtelPaul Wachtel

College: The City College of New York
Department: Psychology
Email: pwachtel@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-5660

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Paul L. Wachtel, Ph.D. is CUNY Distinguished Professor in the doctoral program in clinical psychology at City College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He did his undergraduate studies at Columbia University, received his doctorate in clinical psychology at Yale, and is a graduate of the NYU postdoctoral program in psychoanalysis and psychotherapy. He was a cofounder of the Society for the Exploration of Psychotherapy Integration (SEPI) and is a past president of that organization.
Among his books are The Poverty of Affluence (1983); Family Dynamics in Individual Psychotherapy (with Ellen F. Wachtel) (1986); Action and Insight (1987); Psychoanalysis, Behavior Therapy, and the Relational World (1997); and Race in the Mind of America: Breaking the Vicious Circles Between Blacks and Whites (1999). His most recent books are Relational Theory and the Practice of Psychotherapy (2008), Inside the Session: What Really Happens in Psychotherapy (2011), the second edition of Therapeutic Communication (2011), and the forthcoming Cyclical Psychodynamics and the Contextual Self: The Inner World, the Intimate World, and the World of Culture and Society.
He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and was the winner of the 2010 Hans H. Strupp Award for Psychoanalytic Writing, Teaching, and Research, the 2012 Distinguished Psychologist Award by Division 29 (Psychotherapy) of APA, and the 2013 Scholarship and Research Award by Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) of APA.

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The City College of New York Social Sciences

David WaldstreicherDavid Waldstreicher

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: History
Email: dwaldstreicher@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8450

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David Waldstreicher is a historian of early and nineteenth-century America, with particular interests in political and cultural history. He comes to the Graduate Center from Temple University, where he was a professor of history and coeditor of the Journal of the Early Republic. He previously taught at Bennington College, Yale University, and the University of Notre Dame.
Waldstreicher is author of Slavery’s Constitution: From Revolution to Ratification (2009); Runaway America: Benjamin Franklin, Slavery and the American Revolution (2004); and In the Midst of Perpetual Fetes: The Making of American Nationalism, 1776-1820 (1997). As editor, his books include A Companion to John Adams and John Quincy Adams (2013), A Companion to Benjamin Franklin (2011), Beyond the Founders: New Approaches to the Political History of the Early American Republic (2004) and The Struggle Against Slavery: A History in Documents (2001). He has contributed recent articles to American Political Thought, Rutgers Law Journal, William and Mary Quarterly, and Early American Studies and has written numerous chapters in edited volumes, as well as book reviews for The New York Times Book Review, The Boston Globe, and other venues. He is on the editorial board of Reviews in American History and is coeditor of the Early American Studies book series at the University of Pennsylvania Press.Waldstreicher is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and the recipient of awards and fellowships from the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, New York Public Library; the American Philosophical Society; and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, among others. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Yale University.

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CUNY Graduate Center Arts & Humanities

Michael WallaceMichael Wallace

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: History
Email: mwallace@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 237-8812

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Mike Wallace, co-author of the Pulitzer-Prize winning Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898, is Distinguished Professor of History at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (City University of New York). His most recent book – A New Deal for New York – examines the future of post September 11 Gotham in the light of its past.Wallace was born and raised in New York City and its environs. He got his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Columbia University, studying with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Hofstadter, with whom he collaborated on a history of American Violence published by Knopf in 1970.

Wallace has taught history to police officers and others at John Jay since 1971. His courses include the History of New York City, and the History of Crime in New York City.

He has published a series of essays that explore the ways history is used and abused in American popular culture, including pieces on Disney World, Colonial Williamsburg, the Enola Gay controversy at the Smithsonian, and historic preservation; these have been collected in Mickey Mouse History and Other Essays on American Memory (1997). He helped found and for thirty years helped publish and edit the Radical History Review (now affiliated with Duke University Press).

Wallace has worked with museums, video and filmmakers, radio producers, and novelists to make the best new scholarship accessible to non specialists. He served as a senior historical consultant and “talking head” for Ric Burns’ PBS Special, New York: A Documentary Film, and has advised many local museums, notably the New York Historical Society and the Museum of the City of new York. He has lectured on historical issues in many parts of the country and around the world.

Wallace is now working on the second volume of Gotham: A History of New York City. The forthcoming book, which he is writing on his own, will cover the history of New York City from 1898 through the Second World War.

He is married to Carmen Boullosa, one of Mexico’s most acclaimed novelists, poets and playwrights, and currently Distinguished Lecturer at City College, CUNY.

(bio courtesy of GothamCenter.org)

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John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

Eric WeitzEric Weitz

College: The City College of New York
Department: History
Email: eweitz@ccny.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 650-8166

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Eric D. Weitz is Dean of Humanities and Arts and Distinguished Professor of History at The City College of New York. He was previously on the faculty of the University of Minnesota, where he was Distinguished McKnight University Professor of History and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair in the College of Liberal Arts. Trained in modern European and German history, his work in recent years has extended to the history and politics of international human rights and crimes against humanity. He received his Ph.D. from Boston University in 1983.As Dean of Humanities and Arts, Weitz has been building the faculty and identifying new resources for faculty research and creative activity. He has promoted interdisciplinary collaborations across the College, and has sponsored new programs for students that provide them with major educational experiences outside of New York City. One highlight is the cooperation with Stanford University, in which 10 of CCNY’s best Humanities students engage in research projects over the summer with Stanford faculty mentors. The goal is to prepare them for doctoral programs in the Humanities and, ultimately, to help diversify the professoriate in the United States. In turn, CCNY provides teaching experience for advanced Stanford Ph.D. students.

Weitz has been the recipient of many fellowships and awards from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Council for Soviet and East European Research, and the American Council of Learned Societies, among others. He sits on the Academic Advisory Board of the Center for Contemporary Historical Research in Potsdam, Germany, and on the boards of many journals.
His major publications include Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy (2007; second expanded edition 2013), Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation (2003), and Creating German Communism, 1890-1990 (1997), all with Princeton University Press. Weimar Germany was named an “Editor’s Choice” by The New York Times Book Review, and was included in the “Year in Books” of the Financial Times (London) and “The Best Books of 2007” of The Independent (London). It has been translated into Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Chinese. Most recently, he co-edited with Omer Bartov, Shatterzone of Empires: Coexistence and Violence in the German, Habsburg, Russian, and Ottoman Borderlands (Indiana University Press, 2013), the result of a multi-year, international, and interdisciplinary project. In all his work he combines political, social, and intellectual history.
Weitz is a frequent lecturer in public and academic settings, especially on the historical development of human rights and on comparative genocides. He has written and lectured on the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, and the genocide of the Herero and Nama of Namibia. In 2006 he initiated a book series with Princeton University Press, Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity. Weitz is currently writing A World Divided: A Global History of Nations and Human Rights from the Age of Revolution to the Present.

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The City College of New York Arts & Humanities

Mac WellmanMac Wellman

College: Brooklyn College
Department: English
Email: mwellman@brooklyn.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (718) 951-5480

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Mac Wellmann’s recent work includes The Difficulty of Crossing a Field (with composer David Lang) at ACT in San Francisco and at Montclair in the fall of 2006, and at UT Austin in 2010; and 1965 UU for performer Paul Lazar, and directed by Stephen Mellor at the Chocolate Factory in the fall of 2008. He is also working on two plays for chorus: The Invention of Tragedy (Classic Stage Company) and Nine Days Falling commissioned by the Stuck Pigs Company of Melbourne, Australia. He has received numerous honors, including both NEA and Guggenheim Fellowships. In 1990 he received an Obie (Best New American Play) for Bad Penny, Terminal Hip and Crowbar. In 1991 he received another Obie for Sincerity Forever. Three collections of his plays have been published: The Bad Infinity (PAJ/Johns Hopkins University Press), Two Plays, and The Land Beyond the Forest (both Sun and Moon). Sun and Moon also published A Shelf in Woop’s Clothing, his third collection of poetry, and two novels: The Fortuneteller (1991) and Annie Salem (1996). In 1997 he received the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Writers’ Award. In 2003 he received his third Obie, for lifetime Achievement (Antigone, Jennie Richee and Bitter Bierce all cited). In 2004 he received an award from the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts. In 2006 his third novel, Q’s Q, was published by Green Integer, and in 2008 a volume of stories, A Chronicle of the Madness of Small Worlds, was published by Trip Street Press. His recent books of poetry are Miniature (2002) and Strange Elegies (2006) both from Roof Books. He is the Donald I. Fine Professor of Play Writing at Brooklyn College.

Brooklyn College Arts & Humanities

Douglas WhalenDouglas Whalen

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences
Email: dwhalen@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8806

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Douglas H. Whalen has conducted research on a broad range of topics in speech perception, speech production and cognitive neuroscience, as well as coordinating efforts to document endangered languages. He joined the Graduate Center faculty in 2011 from Haskins Laboratories in New Haven, CT, where continues to hold the position of Vice President of Research. His perceptual work has highlighted the way in which listeners use all information available to them when perceiving a speech signal, even when the information might be misleading and thus better left unattended. Both behavioral and neural imaging work indicate that such a phenomenon is due to the precedence that the speech signal takes in the processing of our perceptual world. Perception of the speech signal is, the evidence indicates, based on recovering the production that produced it, rather than on attending to the sounds per se. This link has led to work on measuring speech production, both in its acoustic aspects (e.g., the pitch of vowels or the planning of coarticulation), the muscles of the larynx, the volume of air taken into the lungs before sentences of different lengths, magnetic resonance imaging of the vocal tract, and finding the surface of the tongue with ultrasound. Combining these efforts has been the focus of a grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, “Links between production and perception of speech,” of which Dr. Whalen has been PI for the past 13 years.These results have been published in a wide variety of journals, from Science to the Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research to Language to the Papers of the Algonquian Conference. His work with the late Alvin M. Liberman has received the most attention, with both the evidence for and theory about the recovery of speech gestures during perception generating continuing debate. He has also edited, with Louis M. Goldstein and Catherine T. Best, a volume of papers from the eighth Laboratory Phonology conference.

Dr. Whalen is President and Founder of the Endangered Language Fund. This non-profit organization provides support for documentation and revitalization of languages in danger of ceasing to be spoken. There are an estimated 3500-6300 such languages, all likely to fall silent within this century. The Fund provides grants to individuals and tribes for such work, both worldwide in the Language Legacies program, and in the northwestern United States, in the Native Voices Endowment: A Lewis & Clark Expedition Bicentennial Legacy. The Fund also sponsors workshops, such as the Breath of Life Archival Institute in Washington, DC, in June 2011.

Dr. Whalen received his Ph.D. in Linguistics from Yale University in 1983, performing the experiments themselves at Haskins Laboratories. Since that time, he has been a full-time researcher and administrator at Haskins, leading or working on a dozen grants from NIH, NSF and other sources. He was elected a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2008.

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CUNY Graduate Center Natural Sciences

Catherine WidomCatherine Widom

College: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Department: Forensic Psychology
Email: cwidom@jjay.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 237-8978

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Cathy Spatz Widom is Distinguished Professor in the Psychology Department at John Jay College and a member of the Graduate Center faculty, City University of New York. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 41 – Law and Psychology), the American Psychopathological Association, and the American Society of Criminology. A former faculty member at Harvard, Indiana, University at Albany (SUNY), and New Jersey Medical School, Widom is co-editor of Journal of Quantitative Criminology and has served on the editorial boards of psychology and criminology journals. She is a frequent consultant on national review panels and has been invited to testify before congressional and state committees. She has published extensively on the long-term consequences of child abuse and neglect, including numerous papers on the cycle of violence. Widom served on the Committee on Law and Justice at the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Research Council (NRC) and was co-chair of the NRC Panel on Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. Professor Widom has received numerous awards for her research, including the 1989 American Association for the Advancement of Science Behavioral Science Research Prize for her paper on the “cycle of violence”. Since 1986, Widom has been engaged in a large study to determine the long term consequences of early childhood abuse (physical and sexual) and neglect and is currently completing research on the intergenerational transmission of violence.

John Jay College of Criminal Justice Social Sciences

Richard WolinRichard Wolin

College: CUNY Graduate Center
Department: Comparative Literature, History, and Political Science
Email: rwolin@gc.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 817-8446

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Richard Wolin is a highly regarded authority in the field of modern European intellectual history. He received a B.A. from Reed College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from York University in Toronto and has held faculty positions at Reed College and Rice University where he was D.D. McMurtry Professor of History. He is the author of several books on subjects such as Martin Heidegger, Heidegger’s influential Jewish students (Hannah Arendt, Karl Loewith, Hans Jonas, and Herbert Marcuse), Walter Benjamin, the history of twentieth-century ideas, and modern cultural criticism. In addition to his scholarly writing, Professor Wolin is a regular contributor to such publications as the New Republic, Dissent, Tikkun, and The Los Angeles Times, which has earned him a reputation as a leading public intellectual. He is on several editorial review boards and has received grants and awards from the German Marshall Fund, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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CUNY Graduate Center Social Sciences

Stephanie WoolhandlerStephanie Woolhandler

College: Hunter College
Department: Urban Public Health
Email: swoolhan@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (617) 312-2766

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Steffie Woolhandler, M.D., MPH is a Distinguished Professor at The City University of New Yorks Hunter’s College, a primary-care doctor in the South Bronx, and a Lecturer in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, where she was formerly Professor of Medicine.

She has published more than 150 journal articles, reviews, chapters, and books on health policy and is a leading advocate of non-profit national health insurance for the United States. She, along with Dr. David Himmelstein co-founded Physicians for a National Health Program. Among her influential scholarly articles are studies on patient dumping (which led to a federal ban on that practice), medical bankruptcy (co-authored with Elizabeth Warren), waste in hospitals and, in medicine more generally, the lethality of being uninsured, and proposals for single payer health reform.

A native of Louisiana, she graduated from LSU Medical School in New Orleans, and completed an internal medicine residency at Cambridge Hospital and a research fellowship in General Internal Medicine at Harvard. During her stint as a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow at the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) she worked with Senator Paul Wellstone and then-Congressman Bernie Sanders.

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Hunter College Urban Public Health

H. ZeiglerH. Zeigler

College: Hunter College
Department: Psychology
Email: hzeigler@hunter.cuny.edu
Office Phone: (212) 772-5363

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After graduating from City College in 1954, H. Philip Zeigler obtained his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin, working with Clinton Woolsey, Wally Welker and Harry Harlow in the areas of animal behavior, neurophysiology and comparative neuroanatomy. A National Institute of Health (NIH) fellowship (1958-1961) supported his training in the nascent field of ethology at Cambridge University, where he worked with R A Hinde—whose penetrating mind and insights helped to reshape animal behavior studies and our perspective of the problem of motivational mechanisms. In 1961, Zeigler joined the psychology doctoral faculty at City College, then transferred to Hunter as a founder/member of the biopsychology doctoral program. After 20 years at the CUNY/AMNH labs Zeigler moved to a new laboratory at Hunter in 1993, where, as Distinguished Professor, he has played an active role in teaching, administration, and undergraduate and graduate program development.Over the past 50 years, using ingestive and exploratory behaviors as model systems, Zeigler’s laboratory has studied trigeminal contributions to sensorimotor integration and motor control. His laboratory is currently exploiting transgenic manipulations to identify specific neural mechanisms. Zeigler developed and currently directs an undergraduate Behavioral Neuroscience Concentration at Hunter and is actively involved in the development of a CUNY doctoral program in neuroscience. Zeigler has been invited to lecture internationally, and his honors and awards include a Guggenheim fellowship and three National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) awards.

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Hunter College Social Sciences